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On leisure demand: a Post Keynesian critique of neoclassical theory

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  • PAUL DOWNWARD

Abstract

Leisure is not a typical theme of analysis in Post Keynesian economics. The analysis of leisure, however, provides an opportunity to critique mainstream economic analysis as well as contributes toward our understanding of an important facet of modern economies. This paper provides an empirical contribution toward this objective by focusing upon leisure demand. As well as drawing upon early Post Keynesian and institutional and sociological analyses, the paper offers original empirical insights from the United Kingdom using a qualitative choice analysis.

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  • Paul Downward, 2004. "On leisure demand: a Post Keynesian critique of neoclassical theory," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(3), pages 371-394.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:postke:v:26:y:2004:i:3:p:371-394 DOI: 10.1080/01603477.2004.11051406
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    Cited by:

    1. Themis Kokolakakis & Fernando Lera Lopez & Thanos Panagouleas, 2011. "Analysis of the Determinants of Sports Participation in Spain and England. Statistical, Economic Analysis and Policy Conclusions," Post-Print hal-00710058, HAL.
    2. Géraldine Thiry, 2015. "Beyond GDP: Conceptual Grounds of Quantification. The Case of the Index of Economic Well-Being (IEWB)," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 121(2), pages 313-343, April.
    3. Sandrine Poupaux & Christoph Breuer, 2009. "Does higher sport supply lead to higher sport demand? A city level analysis," Working Papers 0905, International Association of Sports Economists;North American Association of Sports Economists.
    4. Humphreys, Brad & Maresova, Katerina & Ruseski, Jane, 2012. "Institutional Factors, Sport Policy, and Individual Sport Participation: An International Comparison," Working Papers 2012-1, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
    5. Thibaut, Erik & Vos, Steven & Scheerder, Jeroen, 2014. "Hurdles for sports consumption? The determining factors of household sports expenditures," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 444-454.
    6. Downward, Paul & Lera-Lopez, Fernando & Rasciute, Simona, 2011. "The Zero-Inflated ordered probit approach to modelling sports participation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2469-2477.
    7. Jane E. Ruseski & Katerina Maresova, 2014. "Economic Freedom, Sport Policy, And Individual Participation In Physical Activity: An International Comparison," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(1), pages 42-55, January.

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