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Liquidity Effects and Transactions Technologies

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  • Dotsey, Michael
  • Ireland, Peter

Abstract

Recently there has been growing interest in using general equilibrium models to understand the effects of monetary policy on interest rates and real economic activity. This research effort has involved the search for models that generate liquidity effects. One branch of this research employs cash-in-advance constraints and various assumptions about financial structures that place infinite transaction costs on flow of funds across segmented markets. In this paper, the authors relax the assumption of infinite transactions costs and find that liquidity effects either disappear or are greatly dampened when transaction technologies are more appropriately specified. Copyright 1995 by Ohio State University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Dotsey, Michael & Ireland, Peter, 1995. "Liquidity Effects and Transactions Technologies," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(4), pages 1441-1457, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:27:y:1995:i:4:p:1441-57
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wilbur John Coleman & Christian Gilles & Pamela Labadie, 1993. "Discount window borrowing and liquidity," Proceedings, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Cochrane, John H, 1989. "The Return of the Liquidity Effect: A Study of the Short-run Relation between Money Growth and Interest Rates," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 7(1), pages 75-83, January.
    3. Christiano, Lawrence J & Eichenbaum, Martin, 1995. "Liquidity Effects, Monetary Policy, and the Business Cycle," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(4), pages 1113-1136, November.
    4. Goodfriend, Marvin, 1987. "Interest rate smoothing and price level trend-stationarity," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 335-348, May.
    5. Gordon, David B & Leeper, Eric M, 1994. "The Dynamic Impacts of Monetary Policy: An Exercise in Tentative Identification," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1228-1247, December.
    6. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1990. "Liquidity and interest rates," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 237-264, April.
    7. Don E. Schlagenhauf & Jeffrey M. Wrase, 1992. "Liquidity and real activity in three monetary models," Discussion Paper / Institute for Empirical Macroeconomics 68, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    8. Fuerst, Timothy S., 1992. "Liquidity, loanable funds, and real activity," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 3-24, February.
    9. Lawrence J. Christiano, 1991. "Modeling the liquidity effect of a money shock," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 3-34.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David Andolfatto & Paul Gomme, 2003. "Monetary Policy Regimes and Beliefs," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(1), pages 1-30, February.
    2. McCallum, Bennett T & Nelson, Edward, 1999. "An Optimizing IS-LM Specification for Monetary Policy and Business Cycle Analysis," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 31(3), pages 296-316, August.
    3. Bennett T. McCallum, 1999. "Analysis of the Monetary Transmission Mechanism: Methodological Issues," NBER Working Papers 7395, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. W. Douglas McMillin & William D. Lastrapes, 2001. "Cross-Country Variation in the Liquidity Effect," Departmental Working Papers 2001-04, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
    5. Max Gillman & Mark N Harris & Michal Kejak, 2007. "The Interaction of Inflation and Financial Development with Endogenous Growth," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2006 29, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.
    6. Fernando Alvarez & Andrew Atkeson & Patrick J. Kehoe, 2000. "Money, Interest Rates, and Exchange Rates with Endogenously Segmented Asset Markets," NBER Working Papers 7871, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Benjamin Keen, 2009. "Output, Inflation, and Interest Rates in an Estimated Optimizing Model of Monetary Policy," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 12(2), pages 327-343, April.
    8. Hendry, Scott & Zhang, Guang-Jia, 2001. "Liquidity Effects and Market Frictions," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 153-176, April.
    9. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:5:y:2007:i:21:p:1-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. John D. Stiver, 2003. "Endogenous Financing and the Long Run Impact of Money Growth on Output and Prices," Working papers 2003-36, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    11. Sumner, Scott & Gulley, O. David & Newman, Ross, 1998. "Money Demand and Nominal Debt: An Equilibrium Model of the Liquidity Effect," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 267-293, April.
    12. Kim, Jinill, 2000. "Constructing and estimating a realistic optimizing model of monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 329-359, April.
    13. Fernando Alvarez & Andrew Atkeson & Patrick J. Kehoe, 2002. "Money, Interest Rates, and Exchange Rates with Endogenously Segmented Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(1), pages 73-112, February.
    14. Jinill Kim, 1998. "Monetary policy in a stochastic equilibrium model with real and nominal rigidities," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 1998-02, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    15. Marcelo Bianconi & Joe Akira Yoshino, 2015. "Firm value, investment and monetary policy," International Journal of Accounting and Finance, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(3), pages 262-289.
    16. Keen, Benjamin D., 2004. "In search of the liquidity effect in a modern monetary model," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(7), pages 1467-1494, October.
    17. Ignazio Angeloni & Alessandro Prati, 1996. "The identification of liquidity effects in the EMS: Italy 1991–1992," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 275-293, July.
    18. John D. Stiver, 2003. "Expectations, and Credibility in a Model of Monetary Policy," Working papers 2003-34, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    19. Chung, Kyuil, 2009. "Does the liquidity effect guarantee a positive term premium?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 893-903, September.
    20. Rhee, Hyuk-jae & Turdaliev, Nurlan, 2010. "Aggregate shock and monetary policy regimes," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 201-217, March.

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