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Money, credit, and the cyclical behavior of household investment

  • Cictor E. Li
  • Chia-Ying Chang

This paper focuses on a monetary explanation of two business cycle regularities: (i) business and household investment are positively correlated and procyclical and (ii) household investment tends to lead business investment. We construct a general equilibrium framework that explicitly incorporates a credit sector where real resources are employed in the production of costly household and business credit services. Financial intermediaries provide interest bearing accounts to households and loanable funds for credit producers. It is shown that liquidity effects from asymmetric monetary injections to the financial sector increase the availability of consumer and business credit services. The relative strength of these liquidity effects on business and household spending can provide a mechanism which captures both the direction and timing of their corresponding investments expenditures over the cycle. Furthermore, explaining these observations with a household credit channel also resolves some problematic predictions of existing liquidity effect models.

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in its series Working Papers with number 1998-017.

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Date of creation: 1998
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:1998-017
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  1. Cooley, T.F. & Hansen, G.D., 1991. "The Welfare Costs of Moderate Inflations," RCER Working Papers 266, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  2. Cooley, Thomas F & Hansen, Gary D, 1989. "The Inflation Tax in a Real Business Cycle Model," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(4), pages 733-48, September.
  3. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum, 1992. "Liquidity effects, monetary policy and the business cycle," Working Paper Series, Macroeconomic Issues 92-15, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  4. Greenwood, J. & Hercowitz, Z., 1991. "The Allocation of Capital and Time Over the Business Cycles," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 9104, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.
  5. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark Gertler, 1995. "Inside the Black Box: The Credit Channel of Monetary Policy Transmission," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 27-48, Fall.
  6. Fisher, Jonas D. M., 1997. "Relative prices, complementarities and comovement among components of aggregate expenditures," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 449-474, August.
  7. Robert E. Lucas Jr. & Nancy L. Stokey, 1984. "Money and Interest in Cash-In-Advance Economy," Discussion Papers 628, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  8. Benhabib, Jess & Rogerson, Richard & Wright, Randall, 1991. "Homework in Macroeconomics: Household Production and Aggregate Fluctuations," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(6), pages 1166-87, December.
  9. S. Rao Aiyagari & Zvi Eckstein, 1995. "Interpreting monetary stabilization in a growth model with credit goods production," Working Papers 525, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  10. Fuerst, Timothy S., 1992. "Liquidity, loanable funds, and real activity," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 3-24, February.
  11. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1990. "Liquidity and interest rates," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 237-264, April.
  12. Lawrence J. Christiano, 1991. "Modeling the liquidity effect of a money shock," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 3-34.
  13. Finn E. Kydland & Edward C. Prescott, 1990. "Business cycles: real facts and a monetary myth," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Spr, pages 3-18.
  14. Lawrence J. Christiano & Richard M. Todd, 1996. "Time to plan and aggregate fluctuations," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-27.
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