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Afraid to be free: Dependency as desideratum

Author

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  • James Buchanan

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Abstract

Although collectivist ideas have everywhere fallen into disrepute, this essay argues that socialism nevertheless will survive and be extended in the new century. That gloomy prospect looms, not because socialism is more efficient or more just, but because ceding control over their actions to others allows individuals to escape, evade and even deny personal responsibilities. People are afraid to be free; the state stands in loco parentis. The breaching of plausibly acceptable fiscal limits in the first half of the new century will determine how the basic conflict between welfare dependency and liberal principles will be resolved. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Suggested Citation

  • James Buchanan, 2005. "Afraid to be free: Dependency as desideratum," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 124(1), pages 19-31, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:124:y:2005:i:1:p:19-31
    DOI: 10.1007/s11127-005-4743-2
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alfred Wong & Sofia Fang & Dean Tjosvold, 2012. "Developing business trust in government through resource exchange in China," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 1027-1043, December.
    2. Berggren, Niclas & Bjørnskov, Christian, 2011. "Is the importance of religion in daily life related to social trust? Cross-country and cross-state comparisons," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 459-480.
    3. Dean Tjosvold & Ann Peng & Yi Chen & Fang Su, 2008. "Business and government interdependence in China: Cooperative goals to develop industries and the marketplace," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 25(2), pages 225-249, June.
    4. Richard E. Wagner, 2012. "Deficits, Debt, and Democracy," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14477.
    5. Arye L. Hillman & Niklas Potrafke, 2016. "Economic Freedom and Religion: An Empirical Investigation," CESifo Working Paper Series 6017, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Christopher Coyne, 2015. "Michael J. Glennon: National Security and Double Government," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 163(3), pages 393-396, June.
    7. Panagiotis Evangelopoulos, 2014. "Consequences of the Public Debt Crisis on Growth and Stability," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 4, pages 47-56, August.
    8. William Shughart, 2006. "Katrinanomics: The politics and economics of disaster relief," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 127(1), pages 31-53, April.
    9. Hans Pitlik & Martin Rode, 2014. "Free to Choose? Economic Freedom, Relative Income, and Life Control Perceptions," WIFO Working Papers 482, WIFO.
    10. repec:wfo:wstudy:37321 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:sae:pubfin:v:46:y:2018:i:2:p:249-275 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Peter Boettke & Nicholas Snow, 2014. "Political economy and the science of association: A suggested reconstruction of public choice through the alliance of the Vienna, Virginia, and Bloomington schools of political economy," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 27(1), pages 97-110, March.
    13. Marta Podemska-Mikluch & Darwyyn Deyo & David T. Mitchell, 2016. "Public Choice Lessons from the Wizarding World of Harry Potter," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 31(Spring 20), pages 57-69.
    14. Petrik Runst & Steven Horwitz, 2015. "Alienation and rationality—The retreat of postwar socialism," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 28(2), pages 123-137, June.
    15. Paul Raschky, 2007. "The overprotective parent - Bureaucratic agencies and natural hazard management," Working Papers 2007-03, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
    16. Alejandra, Salinas, 2011. "Los presupuestos psicológicos en política : Una revisión introductoria de la Literatura," Estudios Públicos, Centro de Estudios Públicos, vol. 0(124), pages 84-112.

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