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Profiles of Academic Activities and Careers: Does Gender Matter? An Analysis Based on French Life Scientist CVs


  • M. Sabatier


  • M. Carrere


  • V. Mangematin



The aim of this paper is to analyze the factors that influence the length of time to promotion for male and female academics. Promotion is defined as elevation to a professorship. We examine the role of academic profiles, which are based not only on publications, but also include activities such as fund raising, consulting, teaching, and managerial appointments (dean of a department for instance). The paper examines the factors that speed up or slow down the progress of an academic career for males and females, respectively, to explore the “glass ceiling” effects. Survival and duration models are used to test whether the gender differential persists after controlling for observed and unobserved heterogeneity. The originality of this paper lies in the use of duration models to track sex differences in promotion criteria. It highlights that the different criteria of promotion for male and female academics: women have to demonstrate higher involvement in different networks in order to be promoted. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2006

Suggested Citation

  • M. Sabatier & M. Carrere & V. Mangematin, 2006. "Profiles of Academic Activities and Careers: Does Gender Matter? An Analysis Based on French Life Scientist CVs," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 311-324, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:31:y:2006:i:3:p:311-324
    DOI: 10.1007/s10961-006-7203-3

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jörg Heining & Jürgen Jerger & Jörg Lingens, 2008. "Deutsche Hochschulkarrieren im Fach Volkswirtschaftslehre. Eine deskriptive Analyse von Lebenslaufdaten," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 9(3), pages 306-328, August.
    2. Diana Boehm & Teresa Hogan, 2014. "‘A jack of all trades’: the role of PIs in the establishment and management of collaborative networks in scientific knowledge commercialisation," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 134-149, February.
    3. repec:spr:scient:v:89:y:2011:i:2:d:10.1007_s11192-011-0462-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Pezzoni, Michele & Sterzi, Valerio & Lissoni, Francesco, 2012. "Career progress in centralized academic systems: Social capital and institutions in France and Italy," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 704-719.
    5. Broström, Anders, 2018. "Academic breeding grounds: Home department conditions and early career performance of academic researchers," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 465, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
    6. Heining, Jörg & Jerger, Jürgen & Lingens, Jörg, 2007. "Success in the Academic Labour Market for Economics - The German Experience," University of Regensburg Working Papers in Business, Economics and Management Information Systems 422, University of Regensburg, Department of Economics.

    More about this item


    academic; career; glass ceiling; duration model; survival model; life science; mentoring; J4; O3;

    JEL classification:

    • J4 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights


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