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Career progress in centralized academic systems: Social capital and institutions in France and Italy

Author

Listed:
  • Michele Pezzoni

    () (KITeS - Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies - Università Bocconi)

  • Valerio Sterzi

    (GREThA - Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée - UB - Université de Bordeaux - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Francesco Lissoni

    (GREThA - Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée - UB - Université de Bordeaux - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

We analyze the role of social capital in academic careers. We distinguish between ties with reputed scientists and laboratories (scientific and technical human capital) and ties with influential actors with respect to recruitment/promotion decisions (political capital). We use institution-wise bibliometric indicators to measure separately the two types of capital for a large sample of French and Italian academic physicists between 2000 and 2003/2005. Controlling for scientific productivity, seniority and gender issues, career progress is explained by: the scientist's affiliation to important public research organizations (scientific and technical human capital – France); his/her social ties with senior members of the discipline, who exercise control over careers (political capital – Italy), and the commitment to work with senior colleagues in his/her own university (political capital – Italy). Significant differences exist between the two countries also with respect to the importance of productivity, seniority, and gender.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Michele Pezzoni & Valerio Sterzi & Francesco Lissoni, 2012. "Career progress in centralized academic systems: Social capital and institutions in France and Italy," Post-Print halshs-01074540, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-01074540
    DOI: 10.1016/j.respol.2011.12.009
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01074540
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    Cited by:

    1. Conti, Annamaria & Liu, Christopher C., 2015. "Bringing the lab back in: Personnel composition and scientific output at the MIT Department of Biology," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(9), pages 1633-1644.
    2. Marco Pautasso, 2015. "The Italian University Habilitation and the Challenge of Increasing the Representation of Women in Academia," Challenges, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(1), pages 1-16, March.
    3. Baruffaldi, Stefano H. & Di Maio, Giorgio & Landoni, Paolo, 2017. "Determinants of PhD holders’ use of social networking sites: An analysis based on LinkedIn," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 740-750.
    4. Hottenrott, Hanna & Lawson, Cornelia, 2014. "Flying the nest: How the home department shapes researchers’ career paths," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis LEI & BRICK - Laboratory of Economics of Innovation "Franco Momigliano", Bureau of Research in Innovation, Complexity and Knowledge, Collegio 201409, University of Turin.
    5. Rotolo, Daniele & Messeni Petruzzelli, Antonio, 2013. "When does centrality matter? Scientific productivity and the moderating role of research specialization and cross-community ties," MPRA Paper 53406, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. repec:spr:scient:v:101:y:2014:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-014-1395-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Raffaele Miniaci & Michele Pezzoni, 2015. "Is Publication in the Hands of Outstanding Scientists? A Study on the Determinants of Editorial Boards Membership in Economics," GREDEG Working Papers 2015-17, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    8. Figueroa-Domecq, Cristina & Pritchard, Annette & Segovia-Pérez, Mónica & Morgan, Nigel & Villacé-Molinero, Teresa, 2015. "Tourism gender research: A critical accounting," Annals of Tourism Research, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 87-103.
    9. Sabatier, Mareva & Chollet, Barthélemy, 2017. "Is there a first mover advantage in science? Pioneering behavior and scientific production in nanotechnology," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 522-533.
    10. Fernandez-Zubieta, Ana & Geuna, Aldo & Lawson, Cornelia, 2015. "What do We Know of the Mobility of Research Scientists and of its Impact on Scientific Production," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201522, University of Turin.
    11. Alberto Baccini & Lucio Barabesi & Martina Cioni & Caterina Pisani, 2013. "Crossing the hurdle: the determinants of individual scientific performance," Department of Economics University of Siena 691, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    12. Jürgen Janger & Klaus Nowotny, 2013. "Career choices in academia," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 36, WWWforEurope.
    13. Lorena Rivera León & Jacques Mairesse & Robin Cowan, 2017. "Gender Gaps and Scientific Productivity in Middle-Income Countries: Evidence from Mexico," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 98456, Inter-American Development Bank.
    14. Jürgen Janger & Anna Strauss & David Campbell, 2013. "Academic careers: a cross-country perspective," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 37, WWWforEurope.
    15. Lorena Rivera León & Jacques Mairesse & Robin Cowan, 2017. "Gender Gaps and Scientific Productivity in Middle-Income Countries: Evidence from Mexico," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 8243, Inter-American Development Bank.
    16. Al-Tabbaa, Omar & Ankrah, Samuel, 2016. "Social capital to facilitate ‘engineered’ university–industry collaboration for technology transfer: A dynamic perspective," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 1-15.
    17. Sander Gerritsen & Karen van der Wiel & Erik Plug, 2013. "Up or out? How individual research grants affect academic careers in the Netherlands," CPB Discussion Paper 249, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    18. Brooks, Chris & Fenton, Evelyn M. & Walker, James T., 2014. "Gender and the evaluation of research," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(6), pages 990-1001.
    19. repec:wfo:wstudy:46922 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics of science; gender; Social capital; Academic careers;

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J45 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Public Sector Labor Markets
    • M51 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions

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