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Influence of Perceived Economic Strain on the Relationship Between Caregiver BMI and Child BMI

Author

Listed:
  • Jenna T. Hayes

    (University of Nevada, Reno – Cooperative Extension)

  • Angela VanBrackle

    (University of Nevada, Reno – Cooperative Extension)

  • Madeleine Sigman-Grant

    () (University of Nevada, Reno – Cooperative Extension)

Abstract

Abstract As maternal BMI is a risk factor for higher child BMI, this exploratory study investigated perceived economic strain as a protective factor modifying this well-established relationship. Primary low-income female caregivers (n = 432) of preschoolers ages 3–5 years were interviewed using the Family Economic Strain Scale. Caregiver and child heights and weights were measured. Significant differences were found in perceived economic strain between normal versus underweight, overweight, and obese caregivers. A moderating effect approaching significance was noted such that at low levels of reported economic strain, caregiver BMI classification had no effect on child BMI z-score for normal weight, overweight, or obese caregivers. This study is the first to demonstrate that reduced perception of economic strain may act to buffer the impact of maternal overweight/obesity on child weight status. Given this biologically strong relationship, the potential for any modifiable factor to be detected is encouraging. Further collaborative research between economists and family resiliency researchers is suggested.

Suggested Citation

  • Jenna T. Hayes & Angela VanBrackle & Madeleine Sigman-Grant, 2016. "Influence of Perceived Economic Strain on the Relationship Between Caregiver BMI and Child BMI," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 172-181, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:37:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s10834-015-9468-x
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-015-9468-x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lisa Benson & Manouchehr Mokhtari, 2011. "Parental Employment, Shared Parent–Child Activities and Childhood Obesity," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 233-244, June.
    2. Daniel Miller, 2011. "Maternal Work and Child Overweight and Obesity: The Importance of Timing," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 204-218, June.
    3. Zhuo Chen & Qi Zhang, 2011. "Nutrigenomics Hypothesis: Examining the Association Between Food Stamp Program Participation and Bodyweight Among Low-Income Women," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 508-520, September.
    4. Wen You & George Davis, 2011. "Childhood Overweight: Does Quality of Parental Childcare Time Matter?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 219-232, June.
    5. Yunhee Chang & Swarn Chatterjee & Jinhee Kim, 2014. "Household Finance and Food Insecurity," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(4), pages 499-515, December.
    6. Salem Valentino & Julia Moore & Michael Cleveland & Mark Greenberg & Xianming Tan, 2014. "Profiles of Financial Stress Over Time Using Subgroup Analysis," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 51-64, March.
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