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Effects of Caregiving on Employment and Economic Costs of Chinese Family Caregivers in Canada

  • Daniel Lai

    ()

  • Wendy Leonenko

    ()

Registered author(s):

    A telephone survey with 339 randomly selected Chinese Canadian caregivers examined the employment and economic costs of family caregiving for the elderly. Although the Chinese culture places a strong emphasis on filial obligation, caregiving is not without economic consequences. Caregiver’s age, financial adequacy, and employment, caring for an additional care receiver, and levels of assistance in Activities of Daily Living (ADL), were the predictors for economic costs perceived by family caregivers. Caregiver’s age, caring for an additional care receiver, and care receiver’s financial adequacy were significant predictors for male caregivers. Caregiver’s financial adequacy and higher levels of assistance in ADL were the predictors for female caregivers. Policies to support family caregivers should not just focus on the social aspect, but also the financial needs. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10834-007-9073-8
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Family and Economic Issues.

    Volume (Year): 28 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 3 (September)
    Pages: 411-427

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:28:y:2007:i:3:p:411-427
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=104904

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    1. Hou, Feng & Picot, Garnett, 2003. "The Rise in Low-income Rates Among Immigrants in Canada," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2003198e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    2. Wing, Clement Chow Kong, 1995. "Love thy parents and care for thy children: Filial piety and intergenerational cooperation in traditional China," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 391-408.
    3. Shelley Haddock & Toni Zimmerman & Kevin Lyness & Scott Ziemba, 2006. "Practices of Dual Earner Couples Successfully Balancing Work and Family," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 207-234, June.
    4. Sun-Kang Koh & Maurice MacDonald, 2006. "Financial Reciprocity and Elder Care: Interdependent Resource Transfers," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 420-436, September.
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