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Tax Policy and Human Capital Formation with Public Investment in Education

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  • Simone Valente

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Abstract

This paper studies the effects of distortionary taxes and public investment in an endogenous growth OLG model with knowledge transmission. Fiscal policy affects growth in two respects: First, work time reacts to variations of prospective tax rates and modifies knowledge formation; second, public spending enhances labour efficiency but also stimulates physical capital through increased savings. It is shown that Ramsey-optimal policies reduce savings due to high tax rates on young generations, and are not necessarily growth-improving with respect to a pure private system. Non-Ramsey policies that shift the burden on adults are always growth-improving due to crowding-in effects: the welfare of all generations is unambiguously higher with respect to a private system, and there generally exists a continuum of non-optimal tax rates under which long-run growth and welfare are higher than with the Ramsey-optimal policy.
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Suggested Citation

  • Simone Valente, 2005. "Tax Policy and Human Capital Formation with Public Investment in Education," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 86(3), pages 229-258, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jeczfn:v:86:y:2005:i:3:p:229-258
    DOI: 10.1007/s00712-005-0146-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bouzahzah, Mohamed & De la Croix, David & Docquier, Frederic, 2002. "Policy reforms and growth in computable OLG economies," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 26(12), pages 2093-2113, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Simone Valente, 2007. "Human Capital, Resource Constraints and Intergenerational Fairness," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 07/68, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    2. Valente, Simone, 2011. "Intergenerational externalities, sustainability and welfare—The ambiguous effect of optimal policies on resource depletion," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 995-1014.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    endogenous growth; human capital; overlapping generations; tax policy; public investment; E62; O41; O11;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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