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Cultural and Sport Economics: Conceptual Twins?

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  • Bruce Seaman

Abstract

Is there a role for sports economics in arts research? Despite references to similarities between the arts and sports (especially community impacts, demand interdependencies, and the presence of superstars), the two burgeoning literatures operate in near isolation from one another. This parochialism is not justified by legitimate distinctions; arts labor analysis, in particular, could benefit from sports research. This paper demonstrates this proposition with a focus on: team production functions and income dispersion; unions and rent distribution; managerial and director productivity; earnings functions and changing talent distributions related to competing superstar theories; and career development, screening and human capital theory. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Suggested Citation

  • Bruce Seaman, 2003. "Cultural and Sport Economics: Conceptual Twins?," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 27(2), pages 81-126, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jculte:v:27:y:2003:i:2:p:81-126
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1023416303705
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Karol J. Borowiecki & Catarina Marvao, 2015. "Dance Participation and Attendance in Denmark," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-01-2015, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Apr 2015.
    2. Benno Torgler & Sascha Schmidt, 2007. "What shapes player performance in soccer? Empirical findings from a panel analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(18), pages 2355-2369.
    3. Chong Choi & Ron Berger, 2009. "Ethics of Global Internet, Community and Fame Addiction," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 85(2), pages 193-200, March.
    4. Chong Choi & Ron Berger, 2010. "Ethics of Celebrities and Their Increasing Influence in 21st Century Society," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 91(3), pages 313-318, February.
    5. Egon Franck & Stephan Nüesch, 2005. "Talent, Past Consumption and/or Popularity - Are German Soccer Celebrities Rosen or Adler Stars?," Working Papers 0043, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU), revised 2006.
    6. Sarah S. Montgomery & Michael D. Robinson, 2013. "Women’s attendance at sports events," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Women in Sports, chapter 1, pages 21-39 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Erik E. Lehmann & Günther G. Schulze, 2007. "What does it take to be a star? The role of performance and the media for German soccer players," Discussion Paper Series 1, Department of International Economic Policy, University of Freiburg, revised Mar 2008.

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