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Ethical Consumers Among the Millennials: A Cross-National Study

Author

Listed:
  • Tania Bucic

    ()

  • Jennifer Harris

    ()

  • Denni Arli

    ()

Abstract

Using two samples drawn from contrasting developed and developing countries, this investigation considers the powerful, unique Millennial consumer group and their engagement in ethical consumerism. Specifically, this study explores the levers that promote their ethical consumption and the potential impact of country of residence on cause-related purchase decisions. Three distinct subgroups of ethical consumers emerge among Millennials, providing insight into their concerns and behaviors. Instead of being conceptualized as a single niche market, Millennials should be treated as a collection of submarkets that differ in their levels of awareness of ethical issues, consider discrete motives when making consumption decisions, and are willing to engage in cause-related purchasing to varying degrees. These findings have several critical implications for theory and practice. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Tania Bucic & Jennifer Harris & Denni Arli, 2012. "Ethical Consumers Among the Millennials: A Cross-National Study," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 110(1), pages 113-131, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jbuset:v:110:y:2012:i:1:p:113-131
    DOI: 10.1007/s10551-011-1151-z
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10551-011-1151-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Denni Arli & Fandy Tjiptono, 2014. "The End of Religion? Examining the Role of Religiousness, Materialism, and Long-Term Orientation on Consumer Ethics in Indonesia," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 123(3), pages 385-400, September.
    2. Anna Höchstädter & Barbara Scheck, 2015. "What’s in a Name: An Analysis of Impact Investing Understandings by Academics and Practitioners," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 132(2), pages 449-475, December.
    3. repec:bla:glopol:v:8:y:2017:i::p:42-55 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Michael C. Handrinos & Dimitrios Folinas & Konstantinos Rotsios, 2015. "Using the SERVQUAL model to evaluate the quality of services for a farm school store," Journal of Marketing and Consumer Behaviour in Emerging Markets, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Management, vol. 1(1), pages 62-74.
    5. repec:kap:jbuset:v:145:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10551-015-2893-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Peake, Whitney O. & Detre, Joshua D. & Carlson, Clinton C., 2014. "One bad apple spoils the bunch? An exploration of broad consumption changes in response to food recalls," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(P1), pages 13-22.
    7. Agnieszka Kacprzak & Katarzyna Dziewanowska, 2015. "Does a global young consumer exist? A comparative study of South Korea and Poland," Journal of Marketing and Consumer Behaviour in Emerging Markets, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Management, vol. 1(1), pages 47-61.
    8. Mira Rakic & Beba Rakic, 2015. "Sustainable Lifestyle Marketing of Individuals: the Base of Sustainability," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 17(40), pages 891-891, August.
    9. Jingzhi Shang & John Peloza, 2016. "Can “Real” Men Consume Ethically? How Ethical Consumption Leads to Unintended Observer Inference," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 139(1), pages 129-145, November.

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