IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/ijhcfe/v14y2014i2p161-177.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The effect of extension of benefit coverage for cancer patients on health care utilization across different income groups in South Korea

Author

Listed:
  • Sujin Kim
  • Soonman Kwon

    ()

Abstract

To provide financial protection against catastrophic illness, the Korean government expanded the National Health Insurance (NHI) benefit coverage for cancer patients in 2005. This paper examined whether the policy improved the income-related equality in health care utilization. This study analyzed the extent to which the policy improved income-related equality in outpatient visits, inpatient days, and inpatient and outpatient care expenditure based on triple difference estimator. Using nationwide claims data of the NHI from 2002 to 2004 and from 2006 to 2010, we compared cancer patients as a treatment group with liver disease as a control group and low-income group with the highest-income group. The results showed that the extension of NHI benefits coverage led to an increase in the utilization of outpatient services across all income groups, but with a greater increase for the low-income groups, among cancer patients. Moreover, the policy led to a less decrease in the utilization of inpatient services for the low-income group while it decreased across all income groups. Our finding suggests that the extension of NHI benefits coverage improved the income-related equality in health care utilization. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Sujin Kim & Soonman Kwon, 2014. "The effect of extension of benefit coverage for cancer patients on health care utilization across different income groups in South Korea," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 161-177, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:ijhcfe:v:14:y:2014:i:2:p:161-177
    DOI: 10.1007/s10754-014-9144-y
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10754-014-9144-y
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wagstaff, Adam & Lindelow, Magnus & Jun, Gao & Ling, Xu & Juncheng, Qian, 2009. "Extending health insurance to the rural population: An impact evaluation of China's new cooperative medical scheme," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 1-19, January.
    2. Lu, Jui-fen R. & Leung, Gabriel M. & Kwon, Soonman & Tin, Keith Y.K. & Van Doorslaer, Eddy & O'Donnell, Owen, 2007. "Horizontal equity in health care utilization evidence from three high-income Asian economies," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 199-212, January.
    3. Paul V. Grootendorst, 1997. "Health care policy evaluation using longitudinal insurance claims data: An application of the Panel Tobit estimator," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(4), pages 365-382.
    4. Owen O'Donnell & Eddy van Doorslaer & Adam Wagstaff & Magnus Lindelow, 2008. "Analyzing Health Equity Using Household Survey Data : A Guide to Techniques and Their Implementation," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6896.
    5. David Card & Carlos Dobkin & Nicole Maestas, 2008. "The Impact of Nearly Universal Insurance Coverage on Health Care Utilization: Evidence from Medicare," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(5), pages 2242-2258, December.
    6. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-In-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275.
    7. O'Donnell, Owen & van Doorslaer, Eddy & Rannan-Eliya, Ravi P. & Somanathan, Aparnaa & Adhikari, Shiva Raj & Akkazieva, Baktygul & Harbianto, Deni & Garg, Charu C. & Hanvoravongchai, Piya & Herrin, Ale, 2008. "Who pays for health care in Asia?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 460-475, March.
    8. Charles R. Link & Stephen H. Long & Russell F. Settle, 1982. "Equity and the Utilization of Health Care Services by the Medicare Elderly," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(2), pages 195-212.
    9. Chen, Chin-Shyan & Liu, Tsai-Ching & Lin, Herng-Ching & Tian, Wei-Hua, 2007. "The effect of Taiwan's National Health Insurance on infants' preventive care use and inpatient care use," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 432-443, March.
    10. Likwang Chen & Winnie Yip & Ming-Cheng Chang & Hui-Sheng Lin & Shyh-Dye Lee & Ya-Ling Chiu & Yu-Hsuan Lin, 2007. "The effects of Taiwan's National Health Insurance on access and health status of the elderly," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 223-242.
    11. Liu, Gordon G. & Zhao, Zhongyun & Cai, Renhua & Yamada, Tetsuji & Yamada, Tadashi, 2002. "Equity in health care access to: assessing the urban health insurance reform in China," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 55(10), pages 1779-1794, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Kim, Sujin & Kwon, Soonman, 2015. "Impact of the policy of expanding benefit coverage for cancer patients on catastrophic health expenditure across different income groups in South Korea," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 138(C), pages 241-247.
    2. Han, Kyu-Tae & Kim, Jeeyun & Nam, Chung Mo & Moon, Ki Tae & Lee, Sang Gyu & Kim, Seung Ju & Ju, Yeong Jun & Kwon, Jeoung A & Kim, Sun Jung & Kim, Woorim & Park, Eun-Cheol, 2016. "Association between reduction in copayment and gastric cancer patient concentration to the capital area in South Korea: NHI cohort 2003–2013," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 120(6), pages 580-589.
    3. Kim, Sujin & Kwon, Soonman, 2014. "Has the National Health Insurance improved the inequality in the use of tertiary-care hospitals in Korea?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 118(3), pages 377-385.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health care utilization; Cancer; Universal coverage; Income-related equality; South Korea; I13; I14; I18;

    JEL classification:

    • I13 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Insurance, Public and Private
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:ijhcfe:v:14:y:2014:i:2:p:161-177. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Andrew Huffard) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Andrew Huffard to update the entry or send us the correct email address. General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.