IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

A Guide to Extracting Information from Environmental Pressure Groups


  • Eric Nævdal
  • Richard Brazee


This paper examines the relationship between environmental pressure groupsand environmental policy makers. Environmental pressure groups are assumedto possess valuable private information on environmental issues.Environmental pressure groups are also assumed to pursue their ownpreferences, which are only partially correlated with policy makers'preferences. A new aspect is that binding contracts with side payments arenot allowed, which accurately describes the interaction betweenenvironmental pressure groups and governments. It is shown that by choosingprobabilities of acting on environmental pressure groups' signals, adecision maker can force environmental pressure groups to reveal superiorinformation even in the absence of binding contracts. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Suggested Citation

  • Eric Nævdal & Richard Brazee, 2000. "A Guide to Extracting Information from Environmental Pressure Groups," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 16(1), pages 105-119, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:16:y:2000:i:1:p:105-119
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1008389431896

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Groves, Theodore & Ledyard, John O, 1977. "Optimal Allocation of Public Goods: A Solution to the "Free Rider" Problem," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(4), pages 783-809, May.
    2. Groves, Theodore & Ledyard, John O, 1980. "The Existence of Efficient and Incentive Compatible Equilibria with Public Goods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(6), pages 1487-1506, September.
    3. Burton, Peter S., 1996. "Land Use Externalities: Mechanism Design for the Allocation of Environmental Resources," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 174-185, March.
    4. Hurley, Terrance M. & Shogren, Jason F., 1997. "Environmental Conflicts and the SLAPP," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 253-273, July.
    5. Cropper, Maureen L. & William N. Evans & Stephen J. Berard & Maria M. Ducla-Soares & Paul R. Portney, 1992. "The Determinants of Pesticide Regulation: A Statistical Analysis of EPA Decision Making," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 175-197, February.
    6. Green, Jerry R & Laffont, Jean-Jacques, 1978. " An Incentive Compatible Planning Procedure for Public Good Production," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 80(1), pages 20-33.
    7. Gary S. Becker, 1983. "A Theory of Competition Among Pressure Groups for Political Influence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 98(3), pages 371-400.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Niels Anger & Christoph Böhringer & Andreas Lange, 2015. "The political economy of energy tax differentiation across industries: theory and empirical evidence," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 47(1), pages 78-98, February.
    2. Niels Anger & Emmanuel Asane-Otoo & Christoph Böhringer & Ulrich Oberndorfer, 2016. "Public interest versus interest groups: a political economy analysis of allowance allocation under the EU emissions trading scheme," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(5), pages 621-638, October.
    3. Goodhue, Rachael E. & Gruere, Guillaume P. & Klonsky, Karen, 2002. "Public Preferences, Pressure Groups, And Public Policy Regarding Multifunctionality In Agriculture: Compatibility And Conflict," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19595, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. Anger, Niels & Böhringer, Christoph & Lange, Andreas, 2006. "Differentiation of Green Taxes: A Political-Economy Analysis for Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 06-003, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    5. Anger, Niels & Böhringer, Christoph & Oberndorfer, Ulrich, 2008. "Public Interest vs. Interest Groups: Allowance Allocation in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-023, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:16:y:2000:i:1:p:105-119. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.