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Borders Matter! - Regional Integration in North America / Grenzen sind bedeutsam! - Regionale Integration Nordamerika

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  • Blum Ulrich

    () (Technische Universität Dresden, Fakultät Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Lehrstuhl für Volkswirtschaftslehre, D-01062 Dresden. Tel.: ++49/+3 51/46 334041, Fax: ++49/+3 51/46 33 71 30)

Abstract

We analyze the spatial interaction among regions in North America and in Western Europe. We use a gravity model extended by a spatial correlation structure where data allows to evaluate the spatial interaction in two dimensions: level of impact and the length of the spatial tail. This allows us to address to effects external to the gravity model: importance of neighboring regions on the respective region and size of the cluster of regions. We find that the methodology employed improves the statistical quality of results and their economic interpretation. We conclude that national borders matter and that the North American regional structure, i.e. its cluster structure, is more polarized in terms of firm and spatial network structure than that of Europe. We argue that this relates to different types of institutional arrangements with effects on the spatial division of labor.

Suggested Citation

  • Blum Ulrich, 2003. "Borders Matter! - Regional Integration in North America / Grenzen sind bedeutsam! - Regionale Integration Nordamerika," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 223(5), pages 513-531, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:jns:jbstat:v:223:y:2003:i:5:p:513-531
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Leonard Dudley & Ulrich Blum, 2001. "Religion and economic growth: was Weber right?," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 207-230.
    2. Bernard, Andrew B. & Durlauf, Steven N., 1996. "Interpreting tests of the convergence hypothesis," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1-2), pages 161-173.
    3. Blum, U. & Bolduc, D. & Gaudry, M., 1990. "From Correlation to Distributed Contiguities: a Family of Ar-C-D Autocorrelation Processes," Cahiers de recherche 9031, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
    4. Blum, U. & Dudley, L., 2001. "Religion and Economic Growth: Was Weber Right?," Cahiers de recherche 2001-05, Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en économie quantitative, CIREQ.
    5. Blum, U.C.H., 1987. "A Distributed "Lag" for Spatially Correlated Residuals," Cahiers de recherche 8711, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
    6. Barros, Pedro Pita & Garoupa, Nuno, 1996. "Portugal-European Union convergence: Some evidence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 545-553, November.
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