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Comparative analysis of countries in the peer-group based on economic potential and components of sustainable development

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  • Sergii VOITKO

    (PhD in Economics and is professor at the National Technical University of Ukraine “Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Kyiv, Ukraine;)

  • Irina GRINKO

    (PhD, assistant professor of the department of international economy, National Technical University of Ukraine “Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Kyiv, Ukraine;)

Abstract

The authors study levels of sustainable development potential and determine the positions of Ukraine and other countries in the peer-groups [4], based on individual macroeconomic indicators. The research includes a comparative analysis of absolute and relative terms of GDP, industrial production and the index of competitiveness for the countries included to the peer-groups. The authors analyse the position of countries based on the GDP per capita and components of sustainable development (Quality of Life Index and Security of Life Index). In the article, the authors suggest the methodical approach of performing the comparative analysis of peer-group countries based on their indicators values. This approach gives the possibility to investigate the country’s potential in the limits of the chosen peer-group and propose the recommendations for increase of economic potential in purpose of sustainable development achievement.

Suggested Citation

  • Sergii VOITKO & Irina GRINKO, 2017. "Comparative analysis of countries in the peer-group based on economic potential and components of sustainable development," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 9(3), pages 359-376, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:jes:wpaper:y:2017:v:9:i:3:p:359-376
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Klaus Prettner, 2013. "Population aging and endogenous economic growth," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 811-834, April.
    2. Chen, Li-Ju & Lu, Lee-Jung & Tai, Meng-Yi & Hu, Shih-Wen & Wang, Vey, 2014. "Energy structure, energy policy, and economic sustainable development," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 203-210.
    3. Lee, Keun & Kim, Byung-Yeon & Park, Young-Yoon & Sanidas, Elias, 2013. "Big businesses and economic growth: Identifying a binding constraint for growth with country panel analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 561-582.
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    Cited by:

    1. Serhii Voitko & Olena Trofymenko & Saeb Moghaddami, 2021. "Analysis of the Factors that Ensure the Possibility of Developing Economic Relations in the Field of Renewable Energy Between Ukraine and Turkey," Journal of Economy Culture and Society, Istanbul University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 63(63), pages 127-147, June.

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