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The Relevance Of Eap With Regard To Regional Economic Resilience Capacity Building


  • Sergey LISNYAK

    () (PhD candidate, Doctoral School of Economics and Business Administration, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi)


Currently, the Eastern Partnership (EaP) develops in a very difficult political and economic conditions that may substantially affect the prospects for its existence and building of regional economic resilience capacity. We argue that the nature and pace of previous structural reforms in EaP countries is largely determined by their national institutions, history and economic conditions. It should be clearly understood that the development of this large-scale project in terms of geopolitics involves a number of difficulties and deep reforms in the participating countries. This paper aims to the previous experience and the prospects for further economic cooperation in the framework of EaP as well as to explore the relevance of EaP with regard to regional economic resilience capacity building. According to the result, we state that the formation of such important projects is possible only under favourable economic conditions and a stable political climate. Addressing the regional resilience capacity building and the world as a whole is only possible if the integration units are not created for the purpose of confrontation and isolation, but in the interest of deepening global cooperation and expanding markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Sergey LISNYAK, 2016. "The Relevance Of Eap With Regard To Regional Economic Resilience Capacity Building," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 8(3), pages 364-375, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:jes:wpaper:y:2016:v:8:i:3:p:364-375

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Rolf Pendall & Kathryn A. Foster & Margaret Cowell, 2009. "Resilience and regions: building understanding of the metaphor," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 3(1), pages 71-84.
    2. Lino Briguglio & Gordon Cordina & Nadia Farrugia & Stephanie Vella, 2009. "Economic Vulnerability and Resilience: Concepts and Measurements," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(3), pages 229-247.
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    More about this item


    resilience; economic resilience; Eastern Partnership;

    JEL classification:

    • F6 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development


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