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Aging and Financial Decision Making

Author

Listed:
  • Keith Jacks Gamble

    (Driehaus College of Business, DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois 60604)

  • Patricia A. Boyle

    (Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60612)

  • Lei Yu

    (Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60612)

  • David A. Bennett

    (Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60612)

Abstract

This study examines how cognitive changes associated with aging impact the financial decision-making capability of older Americans. We find that a decrease in cognition is associated with a decrease in financial literacy. Decreases in episodic memory and visuospatial ability are associated with a decrease in numeracy, and a decrease in semantic memory is associated with a decrease in financial knowledge. A decrease in cognition also predicts a drop in self-confidence in general, but importantly, it is not associated with a drop in confidence in managing one’s own finances. Participants experiencing decreases in cognition do show an increased likelihood of getting help with financial decisions; however, many participants experiencing significant drops in cognition still do not get help. This paper was accepted by Teck-Hua Ho, behavioral economics .

Suggested Citation

  • Keith Jacks Gamble & Patricia A. Boyle & Lei Yu & David A. Bennett, 2015. "Aging and Financial Decision Making," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 61(11), pages 2603-2610, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:inm:ormnsc:v:61:y:2015:i:11:p:2603-2610
    DOI: 10.1287/mnsc.2014.2010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Pannenberg, Markus & Friehe, Tim, 2019. "Does it really get better with age? Life-cycle patterns of confidence in Germany," VfS Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig): 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall - Democracy and Market Economy 203497, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Bonsang, Eric & Costa-Font, Joan, 2020. "Behavioral regularities in old age planning," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 173(C), pages 297-300.
    3. Mazzonna, Fabrizio & Peracchi, Franco, 2020. "Are Older People Aware of Their Cognitive Decline? Misperception and Financial Decision Making," IZA Discussion Papers 13725, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Friehe, Tim & Pannenberg, Markus, 2019. "Overconfidence over the lifespan: Evidence from Germany," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 74(C).
    5. Li, Xiao, 2020. "When financial literacy meets textual analysis: A conceptual review," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(C).
    6. Fabrizio Mazzonna & Franco Peracchi, 2018. "Self-assessed cognitive ability and financial wealth: Are people aware of their cognitive decline?," EIEF Working Papers Series 1808, Einaudi Institute for Economics and Finance (EIEF), revised Sep 2018.
    7. Gianluigi Guido & Cesare Amatulli & Andrea Sestino, 2020. "Elderly consumers and financial choices: A systematic review," Journal of Financial Services Marketing, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 25(3), pages 76-85, December.
    8. Oscar A. Stolper & Andreas Walter, 2017. "Financial literacy, financial advice, and financial behavior," Journal of Business Economics, Springer, vol. 87(5), pages 581-643, July.
    9. Posavac, Steven S. & Ratchford, Mark & Bollen, Nicolas P.B. & Sanbonmatsu, David M., 2019. "Premature infatuation and commitment in individual investing decisions," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 245-259.
    10. André Schmidt, 2017. "Determinants of Corporate Voting – Evidence from a Large Survey of German Retail Investors," Schmalenbach Business Review, Springer;Schmalenbach-Gesellschaft, vol. 18(1), pages 71-103, February.

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