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China's role in East-Asian monetary integration

  • Carsten Hefeker

    (University of Siegen and HWWA-Hamburg, Germany)

  • Andreas Nabor

    (Isle of Man International Business School, Isle of Man)

Most proposals for East-Asian monetary cooperation assign a special role to the Japanese yen as anchor currency. We focus on the potential role of the Chinese renminbi. Since China will assume the role of the dominant economy in the region and become a more important destination for Asian products than Japan eventually, this development assigns a special role to the Chinese currency. It is rather unlikely that the renminbi will assume a dominant role immediately, but a comparison with the European monetary integration process suggests designing a system where the relative weight of the renminbi increases gradually. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal International Journal of Finance & Economics.

Volume (Year): 10 (2005)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 157-166

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Handle: RePEc:ijf:ijfiec:v:10:y:2005:i:2:p:157-166
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  1. Ogawa, Eiji & Ito, Takatoshi, 2002. "On the Desirability of a Regional Basket Currency Arrangement," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 317-334, September.
  2. Eswar Prasad, 2004. "China's Growth and Integration into the World Economy; Prospects and Challenges," IMF Occasional Papers 232, International Monetary Fund.
  3. John Williamson, 2000. "Exchange Rate Regimes for Emerging Markets: Reviving the Intermediate Option," Peterson Institute Press: Policy Analyses in International Economics, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number pa60, 03.
  4. John Gilbert & Robert Scollay & Bijit Bora, 2011. "Assessing Regional Trading Arrangements in the Asia-Pacific," Working Papers 2001-20, Utah State University, Department of Economics.
  5. John G. Fernald & Oliver D. Babson, 1999. "Why has China survived the Asian crisis so well? What risks remain?," International Finance Discussion Papers 633, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  6. Bayoumi, T. & Eichengreen, B., 1994. "One Money or Many? Analysing the Prospects for Monetary Unification in Various Parts of the World," Princeton Studies in International Economics 76, International Economics Section, Departement of Economics Princeton University,.
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