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General Resilience to Cope with Extreme Events

  • Stephen R. Carpenter

    ()

    (Center for Limnology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA)

  • Kenneth J. Arrow

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA)

  • Scott Barrett

    ()

    (School of International and Public Affairs/The Earth Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA)

  • Reinette Biggs

    ()

    (Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • William A. Brock

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA)

  • Anne-Sophie Crépin

    ()

    (Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden
    The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Box 50005, 10405 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Gustav Engström

    ()

    (Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden
    The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Box 50005, 10405 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Carl Folke

    ()

    (Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden
    The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Box 50005, 10405 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Terry P. Hughes

    ()

    (Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia)

  • Nils Kautsky

    ()

    (Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Chuan-Zhong Li

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Uppsala University, Box 513, 751-20 Uppsala, Sweden)

  • Geoffrey McCarney

    ()

    (School of International and Public Affairs/The Earth Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA)

  • Kyle Meng

    ()

    (School of International and Public Affairs/The Earth Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA)

  • Karl-Göran Mäler

    ()

    (The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Box 50005, 10405 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Stephen Polasky

    ()

    (Department of Applied Economics, University of Minnesota, 1994 Buford Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA)

  • Marten Scheffer

    ()

    (Department of Environmental Sciences, Wageningen University, PO Box 8080, 6700 DD, Wageningen, The Netherlands)

  • Jason Shogren

    ()

    (Department of Economics and Finance, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071, USA)

  • Thomas Sterner

    ()

    (Environmental Defense Fund, New York, NY 10010, USA)

  • Jeffrey R. Vincent

    ()

    (Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Box 90328, Durham, NC 27708, USA)

  • Brian Walker

    ()

    (Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden
    Sustainable Ecosystems, GPO Box 284, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia)

  • Anastasios Xepapadeas

    ()

    (Athens University of Economics and Business, 76 Patission Street, 104 34 Athens, Greece)

  • Aart de Zeeuw

    ()

    (The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Box 50005, 10405 Stockholm, Sweden
    Department of Economics and Center, Tilburg University, PO Box 90153, 5000 LE Tilburg, The Netherlands)

Resilience to specified kinds of disasters is an active area of research and practice. However, rare or unprecedented disturbances that are unusually intense or extensive require a more broad-spectrum type of resilience. General resilience is the capacity of social-ecological systems to adapt or transform in response to unfamiliar, unexpected and extreme shocks. Conditions that enable general resilience include diversity, modularity, openness, reserves, feedbacks, nestedness, monitoring, leadership, and trust. Processes for building general resilience are an emerging and crucially important area of research.

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Article provided by MDPI, Open Access Journal in its journal Sustainability.

Volume (Year): 4 (2012)
Issue (Month): 12 (November)
Pages: 3248-3259

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Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:4:y:2012:i:12:p:3248-3259:d:21829
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  1. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521791991 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Daniel Kahneman, 2003. "Maps of Bounded Rationality: Psychology for Behavioral Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1449-1475, December.
  3. Krister Andersson & Elinor Ostrom, 2008. "Analyzing decentralized resource regimes from a polycentric perspective," Policy Sciences, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 71-93, March.
  4. Tomkins, Cyril, 2001. "Interdependencies, trust and information in relationships, alliances and networks," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 161-191, March.
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