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Negative Affect and Maladaptive Eating Behavior as a Regulation Strategy in Normal-Weight Individuals: A Narrative Review

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  • Anna Brytek-Matera

    (Katowice Faculty of Psychology, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, 40-326 Katowice, Poland)

Abstract

Emotions have a powerful influence on eating behavior, and eating behavior can have a powerful effect on emotions. The objective of the present narrative review was to evaluate the relationship between negative affect and maladaptive eating behavior as a regulation strategy in normal-weight individuals. A search of the literature within PubMed ® , MEDLINE ® and PsycINFO was conducted using a combination of the following terms: “affect”, “negative affect”, “affect regulation” and “maladaptive eating behavior”. A total of 106 papers were identified for full text review and were included in the final set of literature. The manuscript presents an overview of the literature on negative affect and maladaptive eating behavior. It offers a brief overview of restrained, uncontrolled and emotional eating in normal-weight individuals and looks at maladaptive eating behavior used to regulate their affect. Based on the previous research findings, we argue that using more adaptive strategies for emotion regulation (cognitive reappraisal) might result in downregulating integral negative affect to food and in improving eating behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Brytek-Matera, 2021. "Negative Affect and Maladaptive Eating Behavior as a Regulation Strategy in Normal-Weight Individuals: A Narrative Review," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(24), pages 1-15, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:13:y:2021:i:24:p:13704-:d:700452
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniel Kahneman & Peter P. Wakker & Rakesh Sarin, 1997. "Back to Bentham? Explorations of Experienced Utility," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 375-406.
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    Cited by:

    1. Magdalena Mróz & James J. Gross & Anna Brytek-Matera, 2022. "Trait Anxiety and Unhealthy Eating in Adult Women: The Mediating Role of Cognitive Instability," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 20(1), pages 1-14, December.
    2. António Raposo & Heesup Han, 2022. "The Multifaceted Nature of Food and Nutrition Insecurity around the World and Foodservice Business," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 14(13), pages 1-3, June.

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