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Advancing Food Security through Agroecological Technologies: The Implementation of the Biointensive Method in the Dry Corridor of Nicaragua

Author

Listed:
  • Xavier Simon

    (Department of Applied Economics, University of Vigo, 36310 Vigo, Spain)

  • Maria Montero

    (Department of Economics, University of Vigo, 36310 Vigo, Spain)

  • Óscar Bermudez

    (Amigos de la Tierra España, Managua 14027, Nicaragua)

Abstract

In contrast with international food assistance programs, or with the new green revolution based on the sustainable intensification of agriculture, this work proposes an agroecological technology to overcome food insecurity problems in countries like Nicaragua, most especially in rural areas. In particular, it analyzes the effects of implementing the biointensive method—an agroecological food production initiative that is highly labor-intensive, but requires little land—in various communities of the Dry Corridor in Nicaragua. This project is the result of establishing an international consortium for development cooperation where grassroots communities played a prominent role. The main results are an improvement in local food security and a strengthening of the communities’ capacity to face major challenges arising from poverty and climate change, the effects of which are increasingly noticeable in Central America. The main weakness identified is that the necessary tropicalization of the method has not been sufficiently tested, for a two-year period is too short a time to transform the prevailing rural development dynamics significantly.

Suggested Citation

  • Xavier Simon & Maria Montero & Óscar Bermudez, 2020. "Advancing Food Security through Agroecological Technologies: The Implementation of the Biointensive Method in the Dry Corridor of Nicaragua," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(3), pages 1-18, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:12:y:2020:i:3:p:844-:d:312316
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tranchant, Jean-Pierre & Gelli, Aulo & Bliznashka, Lilia & Diallo, Amadou Sekou & Sacko, Moussa & Assima, Amidou & Siegel, Emily H. & Aurino, Elisabetta & Masset, Edoardo, 2019. "The impact of food assistance on food insecure populations during conflict: Evidence from a quasi-experiment in Mali," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 185-202.
    2. Shannon Doocy & Jillian Emerson & Elizabeth Colantouni & Johnathan Strong & Kimberly Amundson Mansen & Laura E. Caulfield & Rolf Klemm & Laura Brye & Sonya Funna & Jean-Pierre Nzanzu & Espoir Musa & J, 2018. "Improving household food security in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo: a comparative analysis of four interventions," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(3), pages 649-660, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Edwin Villagran & Rommel Leon & Andrea Rodriguez & Jorge Jaramillo, 2020. "3D Numerical Analysis of the Natural Ventilation Behavior in a Colombian Greenhouse Established in Warm Climate Conditions," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(19), pages 1-27, October.

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