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On Resilience

Author

Listed:
  • David Stark

    () (Department of Sociology, Columbia University, 606 W. 122nd Street, New York, NY 10027, USA)

Abstract

This commentary reviews key themes posed by papers in this Special Issue and points to open questions. For example, does resilience in socio-technical systems degrade with use or, like immune systems, is resilience upgraded with use? Similarly, is resilience about responding in the face of the rare event? Or, is it being prepared for the rare event? Is it useful to think about the evolution of resilience? What are the risks posed by models of risk? That is, do models to reduce vulnerability to risk, increase vulnerability? What is the role of reflexivity in the analysis of resilience?

Suggested Citation

  • David Stark, 2014. "On Resilience," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(1), pages 1-11, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jscscx:v:3:y:2014:i:1:p:60-70:d:32830
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Beunza, Daniel & Stark, David, 2012. "From dissonance to resonance: cognitive interdependence in quantitative finance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 45604, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Daniel Beunza Ibáñez & David Stark, 2004. "Resolving identities: Successive crises in a trading room after 9/11," Economics Working Papers 734, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Sep 2005.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    resilience; models of risk; risk of models; observation theory; reflexive modeling;

    JEL classification:

    • A - General Economics and Teaching
    • B - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology
    • N - Economic History
    • P - Economic Systems
    • Y80 - Miscellaneous Categories - - Related Disciplines - - - Related Disciplines
    • Z00 - Other Special Topics - - General - - - General

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