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Henry Thornton: seminal monetary theorist and father of the modern central bank

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  • Robert L. Hetzel

Abstract

Henry Thornton’s Paper Credit of Great Britain (1802) established once and for all the notion that central banks have the prime responsibility for controlling the money stock and the price level. This theme and the analytical framework underlying it reappeared in the famous Bullion Report (1810). There he and his coauthors contended that the central bank’s responsibility should be made explicit and that the mechanics for ensuring price level stability should be a matter of rules, not discretion.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert L. Hetzel, 1987. "Henry Thornton: seminal monetary theorist and father of the modern central bank," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Jul, pages 3-16.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedrer:y:1987:i:jul:p:3-16:n:v.73no.4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McCallum, Bennett T., 1986. "Some issues concerning interest rate pegging, price level determinacy, and the real bills doctrine," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 135-160, January.
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    1. repec:fip:fedreq:00051 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Hume, Michael & Sentance, Andrew, 2009. "The global credit boom: Challenges for macroeconomics and policy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(8), pages 1426-1461, December.
    3. Robert L. Hetzel, 2008. "What is the monetary standard, or, how did the Volcker-Greenspan FOMCs tame inflation?," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Spr, pages 147-171.
    4. Richard S. Grossman & Hugh Rockoff, 2015. "Fighting the Last War: economists on the lender of last resort," Departmental Working Papers 201515, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    5. Arie Arnon, 2007. "The Early Round Of The Bullionist Debate 1800-1802: Boyd, Baring And Thornton’S Innovative Ideas," Working Papers 0714, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    6. Maria Cristina Marcuzzo & Annalisa Rosselli, 1994. "Ricardo's Theory of Money Matters," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 45(5), pages 1251-1268.

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