IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/fip/fedker/y2011iqiiip35-69nv.96no.3.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Would active labor market policies help combat high U.S. unemployment?

Author

Listed:
  • Jun Nie
  • Ethan Struby

Abstract

Two years after the end of the 2007-09 recession, the unemployment rate in the United States remains above 9 percent - roughly double its pre-recession level. ; Nie and Struby analyze the cyclical and structural components of this elevated level of unemployment, active and passive labor market policies, and how the policies are utilized in the United States and 20 Organization for Economic Cooperation Development countries. ; The analysis finds that two active programs can be particularly effective: training programs that equip unemployed workers with skills that are in demand and job-search assistance that matches unemployed workers with employers. These findings - together with evidence that the U.S. labor market currently suffers from a certain amount of structural unemployment - suggest that the United States could benefit from more training programs and job-search assistance.

Suggested Citation

  • Jun Nie & Ethan Struby, 2011. "Would active labor market policies help combat high U.S. unemployment?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q III, pages 35-69.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedker:y:2011:i:qiii:p:35-69:n:v.96no.3
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.kansascityfed.org/Publicat/EconRev/PDF/11q3Nie-Struby.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Schmitt, 2011. "Labor Market Policy in the Great Recession: Some Lessons from Denmark and Germany," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2011-12, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    2. Daniel Aaronson & Jonathan Davis, 2011. "How much has house lock affected labor mobility and the unemployment rate?," Chicago Fed Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Sep.
    3. Edward S. Knotek & II, 2007. "How useful is Okun's law?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q IV, pages 73-103.
    4. Shigeru Fujita, 2010. "Economic effects of the unemployment insurance benefit," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q4, pages 20-27.
    5. Raj Chetty, 2008. "Moral Hazard vs. Liquidity and Optimal Unemployment Insurance," NBER Working Papers 13967, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Jochen Kluve & Christoph M. Schmidt, 2002. "Can training and employment subsidies combat European unemployment?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 17(35), pages 409-448, October.
    7. David Grubb & Agnès Puymoyen, 2008. "Long time series for public expenditure on labour market programmes," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 73, OECD Publishing.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Kopasker & Holger Görg & Hassan Molana & Catia Montagna, 2013. "Negative Shocks, Job Creation, and Selection," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 11, WWWforEurope.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedker:y:2011:i:qiii:p:35-69:n:v.96no.3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (LDayrit). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/frbkcus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.