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A history of emerging domestic markets

  • Glenn Yago
  • Betsy Zeidman
  • Alethea Abuyuan
Registered author(s):

    The Milken Institute’s Center for Emerging Domestic Markets has been a leader in researching and writing about the issue of expanding investment in traditionally undervalued and undercapitalized entrepreneurs, enterprises and communities, including women and ethnic business owners, urban cores, rural areas and low-income populations. This article traces the evolution of the emerging domestic market concept and provides a guide to the existing literature.

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    File URL: http://www.frbsf.org/publications/community/review/062007/yago.pdf
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    Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco in its journal Community Development Investment Review.

    Volume (Year): (2007)
    Issue (Month): ()
    Pages: 1-22

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    Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfcr:y:2007:p:1-22:n:v.3no.1
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    References listed on IDEAS
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    1. Alicia Robb & Robert Fairlie, 2006. "Access to Financial Capital Among U.S. Businesses: The Case of African-American Firms," Working Papers 06-33, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    2. Joe Peek & Eric Rosengren, 1998. "The evolution of bank lending to small business," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Mar, pages 27-36.
    3. Philipp Köllinger & Maria Minniti, 2006. "Not for Lack of Trying: American Entrepreneurship in Black and White," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 574, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Miriam Wasserman, 2000. "Mining data," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q3, pages 17-24.
    5. Gregory D. Squires & Sally O'Connor, 1999. "Access to capital: Milwaukee's small business lending gaps," Proceedings 773, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
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