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Commentary on session III: U.S.-Mexico remittances: recent trends and measurement issues

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  • Jesus Cañas
  • Roberto Coronado
  • Pia M. Orrenius

Abstract

Summary and discussion of the three papers in this session: "Leveraging remittances for development" by Dilip Ratha; "Remittances and their microeconomic impacts: evidence from Latin America" by Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes; and "The relationship between international migration, trade, and development: some paradoxes and findings" by J. Edward Taylor. ; The rest of this commentary explores recent trends in U.S.-Mexico remittances, explaining how they are measured and comparing them with forecasts of remittances based on an econometric model and with trends in other developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Jesus Cañas & Roberto Coronado & Pia M. Orrenius, 2006. "Commentary on session III: U.S.-Mexico remittances: recent trends and measurement issues," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, pages 213-222.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:feddpr:y:2006:p:213-222
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Freund, Caroline & Spatafora, Nikola, 2005. "Remittances : transaction costs, determinants, and informal flows," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3704, The World Bank.
    2. Roberto Coronado, 2004. "Workers' remittances to Mexico," Business Frontier, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jesus Mendoza & Nathan Ashby, 2019. "Mexican Migration Flows to the United States: The Impact of Business Cycles on Unauthorized Immigration to the United States," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 39(2), pages 798-815.

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