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Purchasing power parity within the United States

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  • Geoffrey M. B. Tootell

Abstract

Economics has many articles of faith. One of the most dearly held is Purchasing Power Parity, which posits that the price of the same good in different regions should be equivalent when no barriers to arbitrage exist. Because Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) is an important assumption in much of international economic theory, this article examines empirical evidence testing this proposition. ; Instead of analyzing international data, this study analyzes PPP between regions of the United States. By comparing regions within a country, it eliminates many of the hypotheses offered to explain the failure of PPP. The results of this study are suggestive. PPP fails to hold within regions of the United States. Instead, the inclusion of nontraded goods in the total consumer price indices for these regions is shown to be the major cause of this failure. When the nontraded components of these indices are removed, PPP holds. Some categories of goods do seem to move in lockstep while others do not, as one would expect, and as PPP predicts.

Suggested Citation

  • Geoffrey M. B. Tootell, 1992. "Purchasing power parity within the United States," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Jul, pages 15-24.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbne:y:1992:i:jul:p:15-24
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    File URL: http://www.bostonfed.org/economic/neer/neer1992/neer492b.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Frenkel, Jacob A., 1981. "The collapse of purchasing power parities during the 1970's," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 145-165.
    2. Edison, Hali J & Klovland, Jan Tore, 1987. "A Quantitative Reassessment of the Purchasing Power Parity Hypothesis: Evidence from Norway and the United Kingdom," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 2(4), pages 309-333, October.
    3. Hendry, David F, 1986. "Econometric Modelling with Cointegrated Variables: An Overview," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 48(3), pages 201-212, August.
    4. Meese, Richard A. & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1983. "Empirical exchange rate models of the seventies : Do they fit out of sample?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1-2), pages 3-24, February.
    5. Hakkio, Craig, 1986. "Does the exchange rate follow a random walk? A Monte Carlo study of four tests for a random walk," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 221-229, June.
    6. Giovannetti, G., 1990. "A Survey of Recente Empirical Tests of the Purchasing Power Parity Hypothesis," Papers 1, Roma "la Sapienza" - Scienze Economiche.
    7. Engle, Robert & Granger, Clive, 2015. "Co-integration and error correction: Representation, estimation, and testing," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 39(3), pages 106-135.
    8. Engle, Robert F. & Yoo, Byung Sam, 1987. "Forecasting and testing in co-integrated systems," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 143-159, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lee, Chin, 2015. "Is There Any Regional Price Disparity in Peninsular Malaysia?," MPRA Paper 70592, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    Keywords

    Purchasing power;

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