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Do Penalties And Enforcement Measures Make Taxpayers More Compliant? The View Of Australian Tax Evaders

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  • Dr Ken Devos

    () (Senior Lecturer in Taxation Law Department of Business Law and Taxation, Monash University, Clayton Campus, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)

Abstract

The tax compliance literature indicates that many factors, including, economic, social, psychological and demographic, impact upon the compliance behaviour of individual taxpayers. This study explores the relationship, if any, that exists between selected tax compliance and demographic variables and the compliance behaviour of Australian individual tax evaders. The study employed a mixed method research approach comprising both a survey and interviews. The findings revealed that tax law enforcement measures and to a lesser degree penalties and detection, did impact upon the compliance behaviour of tax evaders. The studys results provide useful information for tax authorities and have implications for tax policy development.

Suggested Citation

  • Dr Ken Devos, 2013. "Do Penalties And Enforcement Measures Make Taxpayers More Compliant? The View Of Australian Tax Evaders," Far East Journal of Psychology and Business, Far East Research Centre, vol. 12(1), pages 1-9, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:fej:articl:v:12a:y:2013:i:1:p:1-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Frey, Bruno S. & Torgler, Benno, 2007. "Tax morale and conditional cooperation," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 136-159, March.
    2. Hasseldine, D John & Kaplan, Steven E, 1992. "The Effect of Different Sanction Communications on Hypothetical Taxpayer Compliance: Policy Implications from New Zealand," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 47(1), pages 45-60.
    3. Wallschutzky, I. G., 1984. "Possible causes of tax evasion," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 371-384, December.
    4. Allingham, Michael G. & Sandmo, Agnar, 1972. "Income tax evasion: a theoretical analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(3-4), pages 323-338, November.
    5. Grasmick, Harold G. & Scott, Wilbur J., 1982. "Tax evasion and mechanisms of social control: A comparison with grand and petty theft," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 213-230, September.
    6. Josef Falkinger & Herbert Walther, 1991. "Rewards Versus Penalties: on a New Policy against Tax Evasion," Public Finance Review, , vol. 19(1), pages 67-79, January.
    7. Alm, James & Cronshaw, Mark B & McKee, Michael, 1993. "Tax Compliance with Endogenous Audit Selection Rules," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 27-45.
    8. Alm, James & McClelland, Gary H. & Schulze, William D., 1992. "Why do people pay taxes?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 21-38, June.
    9. Cowell, Frank A, 1985. "The Economic Analysis of Tax Evasion," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(3), pages 163-193, September.
    10. James, Simon & Alley, Clinton, 2002. "Tax compliance, self-assessment and tax administration," MPRA Paper 26906, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Wenzel, Michael, 2005. "Motivation or rationalisation? Causal relations between ethics, norms and tax compliance," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 491-508, August.
    12. Joel Slemrod, 2007. "Cheating Ourselves: The Economics of Tax Evasion," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(1), pages 25-48, Winter.
    13. Hite, Peggy A., 1988. "An examination of the impact of subject selection on hypothetical and self-reported taxpayer noncompliance," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 445-466, December.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Tax; Penalty; Tax Evaders; Enforcement; Taxation.;

    JEL classification:

    • M1 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration

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