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Ethno-cultural diversity and multidimensional poverty differential in Cameroon

  • Paul Ningaye
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    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to reconcile the multidimensional nature of poverty with a population's cultural conditioning for the purpose of policy evaluation. Design/methodology/approach – Structural equation modeling is the strategy used to compare nested models. Findings – The results show that the observed differences in the dimensions of poverty significantly, but not exclusively, result from differences in cultural valuation systems between groups. Culture influences poverty in two ways: differences in perceptions and differences in the poverty determinants. Practical implications – In consideration of these results, we propose a participatory, decentralized and cautious approach in developing credible poverty-alleviation strategies which respond to the needs expressed by the relevant populations. Originality/value – In this research, the authors adopt a quantitative approach which applies some statistical tests to analyze the effects of cultural values on poverty.

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    Article provided by Emerald Group Publishing in its journal International Journal of Development Issues.

    Volume (Year): 10 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 2 (July)
    Pages: 123-140

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    Handle: RePEc:eme:ijdipp:v:10:y:2011:i:2:p:123-140
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    1. Paola Sapienza & Luigi Zingales & Luigi Guiso, 2006. "Does Culture Affect Economic Outcomes?," NBER Working Papers 11999, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Ravallion, Martin & Lokshin, Michael, 1999. "Subjective economic welfare," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2106, The World Bank.
    3. Menno Pradhan & Martin Ravallion, 2000. "Measuring Poverty Using Qualitative Perceptions Of Consumption Adequacy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(3), pages 462-471, August.
    4. Ravallion, Martin & Lokshin, Michael, 2001. "Identifying Welfare Effects from Subjective Questions," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(271), pages 335-57, August.
    5. Bibi, Sami, 2005. "Measuring Poverty in a Multidimensional Perspective: a Review of Literature," Working Papers PMMA 2005-07, PEP-PMMA.
    6. Caterina Ruggeri Laderchi, 1997. "Poverty and its many dimensions: The role of income as an indicator," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(3), pages 345-360.
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