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Modelling the effect of farming attitudes on farm credit use: a case study from Ireland


  • Peter Howley
  • Emma Dillon


Purpose - By examining the role of farming attitudes and motivations, the aim of this paper is to provide a framework for better understanding farmers' behaviour in relation to the decision to obtain credit. Design/methodology/approach - Using a nationally representative survey of farm operators in Ireland, this paper derives explanatory variables (based on a factor analysis of respondents mean ratings of 13 attitudinal statements) representing three different farming motivations. An ordered logit model is then formulated to examine the effect of farming attitudes as well as personal characteristics and farm structural variables on the degree of indebtedness. Findings - Personal characteristics of the farmer such as age and education as well as farm structural variables such as farm size and farm system were all found to strongly affect decisions in relation to credit use. The study identified how farmers are not just driven by business related goals such as maximising profits but are also strongly motivated by productivist tendencies and perceived lifestyle benefits associated with farm work. These underlying farming motivations were, in turn, found to have a differential impact on credit use. Specifically, business orientated attitudes were found to provide a prime incentive for farmers to borrow funds. On the other hand, farmers who strongly value the benefits associated with the farming lifestyle were less likely to look for credit. Originality/value - Past research has focused on the effect of socio-demographic characteristics and farm structural variables in examining differences in farm indebtedness. This study extends this literature by specifically examining the role of farming attitudes. Obtaining a deeper understanding of the factors that affect the level of farming debt will be important as the degree of indebtedness has been found to affect farmers' management decisions. Outside of explaining farm credit use, farming attitudes and motivations may have an important impact on farmers' behaviour in relation to a variety of farm activities.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Howley & Emma Dillon, 2012. "Modelling the effect of farming attitudes on farm credit use: a case study from Ireland," Agricultural Finance Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 72(3), pages 456-470, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:afrpps:v:72:y:2012:i:3:p:456-470

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Glennon, Dennis & Nigro, Peter, 2005. "Measuring the Default Risk of Small Business Loans: A Survival Analysis Approach," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 37(5), pages 923-947, October.
    2. Escalante, Cesar L. & Brooks, Rodney L. & Epperson, James E. & Stegelin, Forrest E., 2006. "Credit Risk Assessment and Racial Minority Lending at the Farm Service Agency," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 38(01), April.
    3. Allen M. Featherstone & Christine A. Wilson & Terry L. Kastens & John D. Jones, 2007. "Factors affecting the agricultural loan decision-making process," Agricultural Finance Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 67(1), pages 13-33, May.
    4. Ambrose, Brent W & Capone, Charles A, 2000. "The Hazard Rates of First and Second Defaults," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 20(3), pages 275-293, May.
    5. Sam Hakim & Mahmoud Haddad, 1999. "Borrower attributes and the risk of default of conventional mortgages," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 27(2), pages 210-220, June.
    6. Erik Heitfield & Tarun Sabarwal, 2004. "What Drives Default and Prepayment on Subprime Auto Loans?," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 457-477, December.
    7. Nwoha, Ogbonnaya John & Ahrendsen, Bruce L. & Dixon, Bruce L. & Chavez, Eddie C. & Hamm, Sandra J. & Settlage, Daniel M. & Danforth, Diana M., 2005. "Farm Service Agency Direct Farm Loan Program Effectiveness Study," Research Reports 15772, University of Arkansas, Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station.
    8. Jonathan B. Dressler & Jeffrey R. Stokes, 2010. "Survival analysis and mortgage termination at AgChoice ACA," Agricultural Finance Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 70(1), pages 21-36, May.
    9. Jeffrey R. Stokes & Brent A. Gloy, 2007. "Estimating delinquency migration and the probability of default from aggregate data," Agricultural Finance Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 67(1), pages 75-85, May.
    10. Calum G. Turvey & Alfons Weersink, 1997. "Credit Risk and the Demand for Agricultural Loans," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 45(3), pages 201-217, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cathal O'Donoghue & Thia Hennessy, 2014. "Chapter 03: The Agri-Food Sector," Chapters from Rural Economic Development in Ireland,in: Rural Economic Development in Ireland, edition 1, chapter 3 Rural Economy and Development Programme,Teagasc.
    2. Cathal O'Donoghue & Thia Hennessy, 2015. "Policy and Economic Change in the Agri-Food Sector in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 46(2), pages 315-337.
    3. Peter Howley & Emma Dillon & Thia Hennessy, 2014. "It’s not all about the money: understanding farmers’ labor allocation choices," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 31(2), pages 261-271, June.


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