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Microfinance with Chinese Characteristics


  • Park, Albert
  • Ren, Changqing


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Suggested Citation

  • Park, Albert & Ren, Changqing, 2001. "Microfinance with Chinese Characteristics," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 39-62, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:29:y:2001:i:1:p:39-62

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Park, Albert & Sehrt, Kaja, 2001. "Tests of Financial Intermediation and Banking Reform in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 608-644, December.
    2. Jonathan Morduch, 1999. "The Microfinance Promise," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(4), pages 1569-1614, December.
    3. Mark Pin & Shahidur Khandker & Signe-Mary Mckernan & M. Latif, 1999. "Credit programs for the poor and reproductive behavior in low-income countries: Are the reported causal relationships the result of heterogeneity bias?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 36(1), pages 1-21, February.
    4. Carter, Michael R., 1988. "Equilibrium credit rationing of small farm agriculture," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 83-103, February.
    5. Albert Park & Loren Brandt & John Giles, 1997. "Giving Credit Where Credit is Due: The Changing Role of Rural Financial Institutions in China," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 71, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    6. Mark M. Pitt & Shahidur R. Khandker, 1998. "The Impact of Group-Based Credit Programs on Poor Households in Bangladesh: Does the Gender of Participants Matter?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 958-996, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jing You & Samuel Annim, 2014. "The Impact of Microcredit on Child Education: Quasi-experimental Evidence from Rural China," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(7), pages 926-948, July.
    2. Wei Zhang & Haifeng Li & Shigenori Ishida & Eric Park, 2010. "China’s Non-governmental Microcredit Practice: History and Challenges," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 280-296, September.
    3. Jia, Xiangping & Cull, Robert & Guo, Pei & Ma, Tao, 2016. "Commercialization and mission drift: Evidence from a large Chinese microfinance institution," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 17-32.
    4. Alan de Brauw & Scott Rozelle, 2003. "Household Investment through migration in Rural China," Department of Economics Working Papers 2003-01, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    5. repec:kap:jfamec:v:38:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10834-017-9531-x is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Kajenthiran. K & Achchuthan. S & Ajanthan. A, 2017. "A Quest for Seeking Microcredit among Youth: Evidence from an Emerging Nation in South Asian Region," Advances in Management and Applied Economics, SCIENPRESS Ltd, vol. 7(2), pages 1-8.
    7. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:15:y:2005:i:9:p:1-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Turvey, Calum G. & Kong, Rong, 2010. "Informal lending amongst friends and relatives: Can microcredit compete in rural China?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 544-556, December.
    9. Li, Xia & Gan, Christopher & Hu, Baiding, 2011. "The welfare impact of microcredit on rural households in China," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 404-411, August.
    10. Junxue Jia & Cong Qin & Yongzheng Liu, 2017. "Do Community-Based Development Projects Alleviate Poverty? Evidence from Rural China," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1722, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    11. Philip H. Brown, 2009. "Dowry and Intrahousehold Bargaining: Evidence from China," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(1).
    12. Hudon, Marek & Périlleux, Anaïs, 2014. "Surplus distribution and characteristics of social enterprises: Evidence from microfinance," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 147-157.
    13. Jia, Xiangping & Xiang, Cheng & Huang, Jikun, 2013. "Microfinance, self-employment, and entrepreneurs in less developed areas of rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 94-103.
    14. John Weiss & Heather Montgomery, 2005. "Great Expectations: Microfinance and Poverty Reduction in Asia and Latin America," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(3-4), pages 391-416.
    15. You, Jing, 2014. "Risk, under-investment in agricultural assets and dynamic asset poverty in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 27-45.
    16. Dufhues, Thomas & Buchenrieder, Gertrud, 2005. "Outreach of credit institutes and households' access constraints to formal credit in Northern Vietnam," Research in Development Economics and Policy (Discussion Paper Series) 8535, Universitaet Hohenheim, Department of Agricultural Economics and Social Sciences in the Tropics and Subtropics.
    17. Tsai, Kellee S., 2004. "Imperfect Substitutes: The Local Political Economy of Informal Finance and Microfinance in Rural China and India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1487-1507, September.
    18. Byström, Hans, 2007. "Structured Microfinance in China," Working Papers 2007:18, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    19. Chen, Jing & Rozelle, Scott, 2003. "Market Emergence And The Rise And Fall Of Backyard Hog Production In China," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 21969, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    20. Coleman, Brett E., 2006. "Microfinance in Northeast Thailand: Who benefits and how much?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(9), pages 1612-1638, September.
    21. Xiangping Jia & Franz Heidhues & Manfred Zeller, 2010. "Credit rationing of rural households in China," Agricultural Finance Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 70(1), pages 37-54, May.
    22. de Brauw, Alan & Rozelle, Scott, 2008. "Migration and household investment in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 320-335, June.
    23. Hao Luan & Xiangping Jia & Jikun Huang, 2014. "Household Access to Nongovernmental Microfinance, Formal Credit and Informal Credit in Rural China," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 4, pages 61-76, May.

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