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Transit network design and scheduling: A global review

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  • Guihaire, Valérie
  • Hao, Jin-Kao

Abstract

This paper presents a global review of the crucial strategic and tactical steps of transit planning: the design and scheduling of the network. These steps influence directly the quality of service through coverage and directness concerns but also the economic profitability of the system since operational costs are highly dependent on the network structure. We first exhibit the context and the goals of strategic and tactical transit planning. We then establish a terminology proposal in order to name sub-problems and thereby structure the review. Then, we propose a classification of 69 approaches dealing with the design, frequencies setting, timetabling of transit lines and their combinations. We provide a descriptive analysis of each work so as to highlight their main characteristics in the frame of a two-fold classification referencing both the problem tackled and the solution method used. Finally, we expose recent context evolutions and identify some trends for future research. This paper aims to contribute to unification of the field and constitutes a useful complement to the few existing reviews.

Suggested Citation

  • Guihaire, Valérie & Hao, Jin-Kao, 2008. "Transit network design and scheduling: A global review," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(10), pages 1251-1273, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:42:y:2008:i:10:p:1251-1273
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    References listed on IDEAS

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