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Knowledge transfer at CERN

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  • Nilsen, Vetle
  • Anelli, Giovanni

Abstract

The transfer of knowledge and technology is an important part of the mission of most research organisations. At CERN, these activities are driven by a policy focusing on maximising the impact rather than revenue generation. To achieve this, CERN is employing many different modes of knowledge transfer, from licensing of intellectual property, making software and hardware available under open licences and engaging in and catalysing international collaboration. This paper summarises some of the modes CERN use to transfer its knowledge, the rationale for using them and provides some examples of the impact they are creating.

Suggested Citation

  • Nilsen, Vetle & Anelli, Giovanni, 2016. "Knowledge transfer at CERN," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 113-120.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:tefoso:v:112:y:2016:i:c:p:113-120
    DOI: 10.1016/j.techfore.2016.02.014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Federica Rossi & Ainurul Rosli, 2013. "Indicators of university-industry knowledge transfer performance and their implications for universities: Evidence from the UK’s HE-BCI survey," Working Papers 13, Birkbeck Centre for Innovation Management Research, revised Aug 2013.
    7. Jill Sorensen & Donald Chambers, 2008. "Evaluating academic technology transfer performance by how well access to knowledge is facilitated––defining an access metric," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 33(5), pages 534-547, October.
    8. Philippe Mustar & Mike Wright & Bart Clarysse, 2008. "University spin-off firms: Lessons from ten years of experience in Europe," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(2), pages 67-80, March.
    9. Bray, Michael J. & Lee, James N., 2000. "University revenues from technology transfer: Licensing fees vs. equity positions," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 15(5-6), pages 385-392.
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    11. Lockett, Andy & Wright, Mike & Franklin, Stephen, 2003. "Technology Transfer and Universities' Spin-Out Strategies," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 185-200, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrea Bastianin & Paolo Castelnovo & Massimo Florio & Anna Giunta, 2019. "Technological Learning and Innovation Gestation Lags at the Frontier of Science: from CERN Procurement to Patent," Papers 1905.09552, arXiv.org.
    2. repec:eee:respol:v:47:y:2018:i:9:p:1853-1867 is not listed on IDEAS

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