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Team-level flexibility, work–home spillover, and health behavior

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  • Moen, Phyllis
  • Fan, Wen
  • Kelly, Erin L.

Abstract

Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE – Results Only Work Environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large US corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees’ health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline.

Suggested Citation

  • Moen, Phyllis & Fan, Wen & Kelly, Erin L., 2013. "Team-level flexibility, work–home spillover, and health behavior," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 69-79.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:84:y:2013:i:c:p:69-79
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.02.011
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Devine, Carol M. & Connors, Margaret M. & Sobal, Jeffery & Bisogni, Carole A., 2003. "Sandwiching it in: spillover of work onto food choices and family roles in low- and moderate-income urban households," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 617-630, February.
    2. Beauregard, T. Alexandra, 2006. "Predicting interference between work and home : a comparison of dispositional and situational antecedents," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 892, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Bruce Newbold, K., 2005. "Self-rated health within the Canadian immigrant population: risk and the healthy immigrant effect," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 60(6), pages 1359-1370, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fan, Wen & Lam, Jack & Moen, Phyllis & Kelly, Erin & King, Rosalind & McHale, Susan, 2015. "Constrained choices? Linking employees' and spouses' work time to health behaviors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 99-109.

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