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Transition to retirement and risk of cardiovascular disease: Prospective analysis of the US health and retirement study


  • Moon, J. Robin
  • Glymour, M. Maria
  • Subramanian, S.V.
  • Avendaño, Mauricio
  • Kawachi, Ichiro


Transitioning from work to retirement could be either beneficial or harmful for health. We investigated the association between transition to retirement and risk of stroke and myocardial infarction (MI). We followed US Health and Retirement Study participants age 50+ working full-time for pay and free of major cardiovascular disease (n = 5422) in 1998 up to 10 years for transition to full retirement and self- or proxy-report of either stroke or MI (CVD; 665 events). We used discrete-time survival analysis to compare the CVD incidence for the fully retired versus the full-time working population. To distinguish short-term from long-term risks, we compared the association in the first year after retirement to estimates 2+ years after retirement.

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  • Moon, J. Robin & Glymour, M. Maria & Subramanian, S.V. & Avendaño, Mauricio & Kawachi, Ichiro, 2012. "Transition to retirement and risk of cardiovascular disease: Prospective analysis of the US health and retirement study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 526-530.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:75:y:2012:i:3:p:526-530 DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.04.004

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. M. Solaiman Miah & Virginia Wilcox-Gok, 2007. "Do the sick retire early? Chronic illness, asset accumulation and early retirement," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(15), pages 1921-1936.
    2. F. Thomas Juster & Richard Suzman, 1995. " An Overview of the Health and Retirement Study," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30, pages s7-s56.
    3. Dhaval Dave & R. Inas Rashad & Jasmina Spasojevic, 2008. "The Effects of Retirement on Physical and Mental Health Outcomes," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 497-523, October.
    4. Stefanie Behncke, 2012. "Does retirement trigger ill health?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(3), pages 282-300, March.
    5. Coe, Norma B. & Zamarro, Gema, 2011. "Retirement effects on health in Europe," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 77-86, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:jopoec:v:31:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s00148-017-0664-x is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Hagen, Johannes, 2016. "What are the Health effects of postponing retirement? An instrumental variable approach," Working Paper Series 2016:11, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    3. Hessel, Philipp, 2016. "Does retirement (really) lead to worse health among European men and women across all educational levels?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 19-26.


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