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Multilevel analysis of income, income inequalities and health in Spain

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  • Karlsdotter, Kristina
  • Martín Martín, José J.
  • López del Amo González, M. Puerto

Abstract

The aim of this study is to test the influence of personal income (absolute income hypothesis), income inequalities and welfare (relative income hypothesis) on health. A multilevel cross-sectional logit model is used with two alternative specifications of the dependent variable: self-perceived health and chronic illnesses, and six specifications of the income inequality: three positive and three normative. This study incorporates lagged values of the regional variables and interactions between the individual and the regional variables. The data is drawn from the Spanish Life Conditions Survey for 2007 and consists of 28,023 individuals over 16 from 17 Autonomous Communities.

Suggested Citation

  • Karlsdotter, Kristina & Martín Martín, José J. & López del Amo González, M. Puerto, 2012. "Multilevel analysis of income, income inequalities and health in Spain," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(7), pages 1099-1106.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:74:y:2012:i:7:p:1099-1106
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.12.020
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Nigel Kragten & Jesper Rözer, 2017. "The Income Inequality Hypothesis Revisited: Assessing the Hypothesis Using Four Methodological Approaches," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 131(3), pages 1015-1033, April.
    2. Loree, Jacob, 2015. "State Level Income Inequality and Individual Self-Reported Health Status: Evidence from the United States," MPRA Paper 72638, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Nádia Simões & Nuno Crespo & Sandrina B. Moreira & Celeste A. Varum, 2016. "Measurement and determinants of health poverty and richness: evidence from Portugal," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 50(4), pages 1331-1358, June.

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