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Informal and formal care for elderly persons: How adult children's characteristics affect the use of formal care in Japan

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  • Hanaoka, Chie
  • Norton, Edward C.

Abstract

Informal care by adult children remains the most common source of caregiving for elderly parents in Japan, even after the introduction of long-term care insurance in 2000. We estimate how the potential supply of child caregivers affects the use of formal care of elderly parents, focusing on the differences across children. We find that the effects of children's presence vary substantially with gender, marital status, and opportunity costs of children. The potential supply of daughters-in-law, as the traditional source of informal care, is less important in providing care than that of unmarried children. The opportunity costs of children make a difference in the use of formal long-term care.

Suggested Citation

  • Hanaoka, Chie & Norton, Edward C., 2008. "Informal and formal care for elderly persons: How adult children's characteristics affect the use of formal care in Japan," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(6), pages 1002-1008, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:67:y:2008:i:6:p:1002-1008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Van Houtven, Courtney Harold & Norton, Edward C., 2008. "Informal care and Medicare expenditures: Testing for heterogeneous treatment effects," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 134-156, January.
    2. Steven Stern, 1995. "Estimating Family Long-Term Care Decisions in the Presence of Endogenous Child Characteristics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(3), pages 551-580.
    3. Yamamoto, Noriko & Wallhagen, Margaret I., 1998. "Service use by family caregivers in Japan," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 47(5), pages 677-691, September.
    4. Kathleen M. McGarry, 1998. "Caring for the Elderly: The Role of Adult Children," NBER Chapters,in: Inquiries in the Economics of Aging, pages 133-166 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Norton, Edward C., 2000. "Long-term care," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 17, pages 955-994 Elsevier.
    6. Van Houtven, Courtney Harold & Norton, Edward C., 2004. "Informal care and health care use of older adults," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1159-1180, November.
    7. Carmichael, Fiona & Charles, Susan, 2003. "The opportunity costs of informal care: does gender matter?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 781-803, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Matteo Lippi Bruni & Cristina Ugolini, 2016. "Delegating home care for the elderly to external caregivers? An empirical study on Italian data," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 155-183, March.
    2. repec:bla:asiapr:v:12:y:2017:i:1:p:95-112 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Niimi, Yoko, 2017. "Does Providing Informal Elderly Care Hasten Retirement? Evidence from Japan," AGI Working Paper Series 2017-07, Asian Growth Research Institute.
    4. Torbica, Aleksandra & Calciolari, Stefano & Fattore, Giovanni, 2015. "Does informal care impact utilization of healthcare services? Evidence from a longitudinal study of stroke patients," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 29-38.
    5. Tokunaga, Mutsumi & Hashimoto, Hideki & Tamiya, Nanako, 2015. "A gap in formal long-term care use related to characteristics of caregivers and households, under the public universal system in Japan: 2001–2010," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(6), pages 840-849.
    6. David C. Grabowski & Edward C. Norton & Courtney H. Van Houtven, 2012. "Informal Care," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Health Economics, Second Edition, chapter 30 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama & Sayaka Nakamura, 2015. "Reciprocity in the Formation of Intergenerational Coresidence," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 192-209, June.
    8. Evelyn Korn & Matthias Wrede, 2012. "The effect of long term subsidies on female labor supply and fertility," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201243, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    9. Sugawara, Shinya & Nakamura, Jiro, 2014. "Can formal elderly care stimulate female labor supply? The Japanese experience," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 98-115.
    10. repec:eee:hapoch:v1_951 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Alain Paraponaris & Bérengère Davin & Pierre Verger, 2012. "Formal and informal care for disabled elderly living in the community: an appraisal of French care composition and costs," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(3), pages 327-336, June.
    12. Rapp, Thomas & Grand, Alain & Cantet, Christelle & Andrieu, Sandrine & Coley, Nicola & Portet, Florence & Vellas, Bruno, 2011. "Public financial support receipt and non-medical resource utilization in Alzheimer's disease results from the PLASA study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 72(8), pages 1310-1316, April.
    13. Yoko Niimi, 2016. "The “Costs” of informal care: an analysis of the impact of elderly care on caregivers’ subjective well-being in Japan," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 779-810, December.
    14. Evelyn Korn & Matthias Wrede, 2012. "The Effect of Long-Term-Care Subsidies on Female Labor Supply and Fertility," CESifo Working Paper Series 3931, CESifo Group Munich.
    15. Narimasa Kumagai, 2017. "Distinct impacts of high intensity caregiving on caregivers’ mental health and continuation of caregiving," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 1-14, December.
    16. Michio Yuda & Jinkook Lee, 2016. "Effects of Informal Caregivers' Health on Care Recipients," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 192-210, June.

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