IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/socmed/v67y2008i1p122-127.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Transitions into informal caregiving and out of paid employment of women in their 50s

Author

Listed:
  • Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke
  • Lucke, Jayne
  • Hockey, Richard
  • Dobson, Annette

Abstract

Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health were used to study the order of events leading to informal caregiving and changes in labour force participation in mid-aged women, taking into account health and socioeconomic status. This analysis included 9857 women who responded to the third (2001) and fourth (2004) surveys and provided data for the caring and employment variables used. Caring was defined as providing care for an ill, frail or disabled person at least 7Â h/wk. Between 2001 and 2004, the proportion of women caring increased from 12 to 14%. Paid employment participation decreased from 67 to 62% in 2004. Logistic regression model results show that taking up caring between 2001 and 2004 was not statistically significantly associated with employment status in 2001. Among women who took up caring, however, hours spent in paid employment in 2001 was negatively associated with hours spent caring in 2004. Amongst women working in 2001, taking up caring between 2001 and 2004 was associated with reduced participation in paid employment. In conclusion, among mid-aged women, transitions into caregiving were irrespective of time spent in paid employment, but were followed by a decrease in labour force participation. Policies could aim to support continuing labour force participation during caregiving by creating flexible working arrangements; re-employment programs could support women who quit work in getting back to paid employment after a period of caregiving.

Suggested Citation

  • Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke & Lucke, Jayne & Hockey, Richard & Dobson, Annette, 2008. "Transitions into informal caregiving and out of paid employment of women in their 50s," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 122-127, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:67:y:2008:i:1:p:122-127
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277-9536(08)00165-2
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Heitmueller, Axel, 2007. "The chicken or the egg?: Endogeneity in labour market participation of informal carers in England," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 536-559, May.
    2. Susan Ettner, 1995. "The impact of “parent care” on female labor supply decisions," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 32(1), pages 63-80, February.
    3. Carmichael, Fiona & Charles, Sue, 1998. "The labour market costs of community care1," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 747-765, December.
    4. Lixin Cai & Guyonne Kalb, 2006. "Health status and labour force participation: evidence from Australia," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(3), pages 241-261.
    5. Carmichael, Fiona & Charles, Susan, 2003. "The opportunity costs of informal care: does gender matter?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 781-803, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Zeng-Hua Lu & Alec Zuo, 2010. "Effects Of A Child'S Disability On Affected Female'S Labour Supply In Australia," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 222-240, September.
    2. repec:bla:ecorec:v:93:y:2017:i:302:p:395-419 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Niimi, Yoko, 2017. "Does Providing Informal Elderly Care Hasten Retirement? Evidence from Japan," AGI Working Paper Series 2017-07, Asian Growth Research Institute.
    4. Jacobs, Josephine C. & Van Houtven, Courtney H. & Laporte, Audrey & Coyte, Peter C., 2015. "Baby Boomer caregivers in the workforce: Do they fare better or worse than their predecessors?," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 6(C), pages 89-101.
    5. Ha Trong Nguyen & Luke B. Connelly, 2017. "The Dynamics of Informal Care Provision in an Australian Household Panel Survey: Previous Work Characteristics and Future Care Provision," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 93(302), pages 395-419, September.
    6. Heger, Dörte & Korfhage, Thorben, 2017. "Does the negative effect of caregiving on work persist over time?," Ruhr Economic Papers 703, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    7. Nguyen, Ha Trong & Connelly, Luke Brian, 2014. "The effect of unpaid caregiving intensity on labour force participation: Results from a multinomial endogenous treatment model," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 115-122.
    8. Geyer, J.; Korfhage, T.;, 2017. "Long-term care reform and the labor supply of informal caregivers – evidence from a quasi-experiment," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 17/20, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    9. repec:dau:papers:123456789/9523 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Bauer, Jan Michael & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso, 2015. "Impacts of Informal Caregiving on Caregiver Employment, Health, and Family," IZA Discussion Papers 8851, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Jacobs, Josephine C. & Laporte, Audrey & Van Houtven, Courtney H. & Coyte, Peter C., 2014. "Caregiving intensity and retirement status in Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 74-82.
    12. Cristina Vilaplana Prieto & Sergi Jiménez-Martín, 2015. "Unmet needs in formal care: kindling the spark for caregiving behavior," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 153-184, June.
    13. Jacobs, Josephine C. & Lilly, Meredith B. & Ng, Carita & Coyte, Peter C., 2013. "The fiscal impact of informal caregiving to home care recipients in Canada: How the intensity of care influences costs and benefits to government," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 102-109.
    14. Nishimura, Y.; Oikawa, M.;, 2017. "Effects of Informal Elderly Care on Labor Supply: Exploitation of Government Intervention on the Supply Side of Elderly Care Market," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 17/02, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    15. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00639928 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Roméo Fontaine, 2009. "Aider Un Parent Âgé Se Fait-Il Au Détriment De L'Emploi ?," Post-Print hal-01427383, HAL.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:67:y:2008:i:1:p:122-127. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/315/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.