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Psychological distress in North America during COVID-19: The role of pandemic-related stressors

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  • Zheng, Jason
  • Morstead, Talia
  • Sin, Nancy
  • Klaiber, Patrick
  • Umberson, Debra
  • Kamble, Shanmukh
  • DeLongis, Anita

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on lives around the globe. In addition to the primary threat of infection, widespread secondary stressors associated with the pandemic have included social isolation, financial insecurity, resource scarcity, and occupational difficulties.

Suggested Citation

  • Zheng, Jason & Morstead, Talia & Sin, Nancy & Klaiber, Patrick & Umberson, Debra & Kamble, Shanmukh & DeLongis, Anita, 2021. "Psychological distress in North America during COVID-19: The role of pandemic-related stressors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 270(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:270:y:2021:i:c:s0277953621000198
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2021.113687
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bierman, Alex & Upenieks, Laura & Glavin, Paul & Schieman, Scott, 2021. "Accumulation of economic hardship and health during the COVID-19 pandemic: Social causation or selection?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 275(C).

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