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From collective learning to Silicon Valley replication: The limits to synergistic entrepreneurship in Sophia Antipolis


  • Isaak, Robert


Taking Silicon Valley as a "Weberian ideal type" of high-tech development, one can derive 10 key characteristics which together can be used to measure to what extent other regions of the world have been able to duplicate this "hot spot" of economic transformation. Comparisons of such synergistic entrepreneurship are illustrated by the case of Sophia Antipolis in France, characterized by initial large company involvement, a utopian environmental design by Pierre Laffitte and the process of high-tech innovation among small and medium-sized companies, particularly in the telecommunication sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Isaak, Robert, 2009. "From collective learning to Silicon Valley replication: The limits to synergistic entrepreneurship in Sophia Antipolis," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 134-143, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:riibaf:v:23:y:2009:i:2:p:134-143

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Christian Longhi, 1999. "Networks, Collective Learning and Technology Development in Innovative High Technology Regions: The Case of Sophia-Antipolis," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(4), pages 333-342.
    2. Hubert Schmitz, 2000. "Does Local Co-operation Matter? Evidence from Industrial Clusters in South Asia and Latin America," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(3), pages 323-336.
    3. Roberta Rabellotti & Hubert Schmitz, 1999. "The Internal Heterogeneity of Industrial Districts in Italy, Brazil and Mexico," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(2), pages 97-108.
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