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Investigating links between transport disadvantage, social exclusion and well-being in Melbourne - Updated results

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  • Currie, Grahama
  • Richardson, Tony
  • Smyth, Paul
  • Vella-Brodrick, Dianne
  • Hine, Julian
  • Lucas, Karen
  • Stanley, Janet
  • Morris, Jenny
  • Kinnear, Ray
  • Stanley, John

Abstract

This paper updates results of an international study aimed at quantifying the links between transport disadvantage (TD), social exclusion (SE) and well-being (WB) in Melbourne, Australia. The study extends knowledge associated with SE and transport by quantify social and behavioural implications of lack of public and private transport and the nature of the social WB benefits associated with improving services. Study aims and methodology are outlined. Recent findings covered relate to car ownership on the urban fringe, patterns of transport disadvantage, the analysis of time poverty related to transport disadvantage, measuring the economic value of additional mobility and use of a Structural Equation Model (SEM) to relate WB and SE to TD and a series of explanatory factors. Overall results suggest that those without a car on the urban fringe adjust well with their circumstances by living close to activity centres. They demonstrate sustainable choices, trading off budgets and home location to balance mobility and accessibility. Poorer households with high car ownership value mobility and cheaper more remote fringe dwellings but demonstrate numerous strategies to reduce high car costs which are acknowledged as a significant burden. Analysis identifies 4 key types of transport disadvantage including a [`]vulnerable/impaired' group which should be of much greater concern for targeted policy than others due to poor scoring on SE and WB scales. The economic value of new mobility is also explored with results suggesting $AUD 20 per average new trip which is four times larger than conventional values for generated travel. Analysis has also suggested that transport disadvantage can relate to socially advantaged as well as socially disadvantaged groups through time poverty. This was found to be an important mitigating factor when relating TD to WB. A statistically reliable structural equation model is developed suggesting the SE-WB link is strong (-.87) with a modest link between TD-SE (.27). Areas for future research in the project are also summarised.

Suggested Citation

  • Currie, Grahama & Richardson, Tony & Smyth, Paul & Vella-Brodrick, Dianne & Hine, Julian & Lucas, Karen & Stanley, Janet & Morris, Jenny & Kinnear, Ray & Stanley, John, 2010. "Investigating links between transport disadvantage, social exclusion and well-being in Melbourne - Updated results," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 287-295.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:retrec:v:29:y:2010:i:1:p:287-295
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Graham Currie & Alexa Delbosc, 2010. "Modelling the social and psychological impacts of transport disadvantage," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(6), pages 953-966, November.
    2. Currie, Graham, 2010. "Quantifying spatial gaps in public transport supply based on social needs," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 31-41.
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    Cited by:

    1. Saberi, Meead & Wu, Hongzhi & Amoh-Gyimah, Richard & Smith, Jonathan & Arunachalam, Dharmalingam, 2017. "Measuring housing and transportation affordability: A case study of Melbourne, Australia," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 134-146.
    2. Stewart, Anson F. & Zegras, P. Christopher, 2016. "CoAXs: A Collaborative Accessibility-based Stakeholder Engagement System for communicating transport impacts," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 423-433.
    3. Groth, Sören, 2019. "Multimodal divide: Reproduction of transport poverty in smart mobility trends," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 56-71.
    4. Duvarci, Yavuz & Yigitcanlar, Tan & Mizokami, Shoshi, 2015. "Transportation disadvantage impedance indexing: A methodological approach to reduce policy shortcomings," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 61-75.
    5. Mejia-Dorantes, Lucia, 2018. "An example of working women in Mexico City: How can their vision reshape transport policy?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 97-111.
    6. Muhammad Adeel & Anthony Gar-On Yeh & Feng Zhang, 2016. "Transportation disadvantage and activity participation in the cities of Rawalpindi and Islamabad, Pakistan," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 65025, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Tao, Sui & He, Sylvia Y. & Kwan, Mei-Po & Luo, Shuli, 2020. "Does low income translate into lower mobility? An investigation of activity space in Hong Kong between 2002 and 2011," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 82(C).
    8. Adeel, Muhammad & Yeh, Anthony Gar-On & Zhang, Feng, 2016. "Transportation disadvantage and activity participation in the cities of Rawalpindi and Islamabad, Pakistan," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 1-12.
    9. Lucas, Karen & Bates, John & Moore, José & Carrasco, Juan Antonio, 2016. "Modelling the relationship between travel behaviours and social disadvantage," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 157-173.
    10. Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa & Smyth, Russell, 2019. "Transport poverty and subjective wellbeing," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 40-54.
    11. Hamidi, Zahra & Camporeale, Rosalia & Caggiani, Leonardo, 2019. "Inequalities in access to bike-and-ride opportunities: Findings for the city of Malmö," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 673-688.
    12. Badland, Hannah & Pearce, Jamie, 2019. "Liveable for whom? Prospects of urban liveability to address health inequities," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 232(C), pages 94-105.
    13. He, Sylvia Y. & Cheung, Yannie H.Y. & Tao, Sui, 2018. "Travel mobility and social participation among older people in a transit metropolis: A socio-spatial-temporal perspective," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 608-626.
    14. Xia, Jianhong(Cecilia) & Nesbitt, Joshua & Daley, Rebekah & Najnin, Arfanara & Litman, Todd & Tiwari, Surya Prasad, 2016. "A multi-dimensional view of transport-related social exclusion: A comparative study of Greater Perth and Sydney," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 205-221.
    15. Maria Kett & Marcella Deluca, 2016. "Transport and Access to Inclusive Education in Mashonaland West Province, Zimbabwe," Social Inclusion, Cogitatio Press, vol. 4(3), pages 61-71.
    16. Kristin Ystmark Bjerkan & Liv Rakel Øvstedal, 2020. "Functional requirements for inclusive transport," Transportation, Springer, vol. 47(3), pages 1177-1198, June.
    17. Md. Kamruzzaman & Tan Yigitcanlar & Jay Yang & Mohd Afzan Mohamed, 2016. "Measures of Transport-Related Social Exclusion: A Critical Review of the Literature," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(7), pages 1-30, July.
    18. Laura McCarthy & Alexa Delbosc & Graham Currie & Andrew Molloy, 2017. "Factors influencing travel mode choice among families with young children (aged 0–4): a review of the literature," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(6), pages 767-781, November.
    19. Bantis, Thanos & Haworth, James, 2020. "Assessing transport related social exclusion using a capabilities approach to accessibility framework: A dynamic Bayesian network approach," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 84(C).
    20. Ricciardi, Anthony Michael & Xia, Jianhong(Cecilia) & Currie, Graham, 2015. "Exploring public transport equity between separate disadvantaged cohorts: a case study in Perth, Australia," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 111-122.
    21. Olaru, Doina & Mulley, Corinne & Smith, Brett & Ma, Liang, 2017. "Policy-led selection of the most appropriate empirical model to estimate hedonic prices in the residential market," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 213-228.
    22. Belton Chevallier, Leslie & Motte-Baumvol, Benjamin & Fol, Sylvie & Jouffe, Yves, 2018. "Coping with the costs of car dependency: A system of expedients used by low-income households on the outskirts of Dijon and Paris," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 79-88.

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