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Tax more or spend less? Asymmetries in the UK revenue-expenditure nexus

Author

Listed:
  • Saunoris, James W.
  • Payne, James E.

Abstract

Unlike previous research on the causal relationship between government revenues and expenditures in the United Kingdom, this study estimates an asymmetric error correction model within a momentum threshold autoregressive framework over the period 1955-2009. The results indicate that government revenues respond to short-run changes in government expenditures as well as asymmetrically to budgetary disequilibrium. With respect to the asymmetric adjustment, the response of government revenues to a worsening budget is faster (in absolute terms) than to an improving budget. Thus, contrary to previous studies on the UK, the empirical findings lend support for the spend-tax hypothesis.

Suggested Citation

  • Saunoris, James W. & Payne, James E., 2010. "Tax more or spend less? Asymmetries in the UK revenue-expenditure nexus," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 478-487, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:32:y::i:4:p:478-487
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Phiri, 2018. "How sustainable are fiscal budgets in the Kingdom of Swaziland?," Working Papers 1810, Department of Economics, Nelson Mandela University, revised Mar 2018.
    2. repec:rjr:romjef:v::y:2017:i:1:p:116-127 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Artzrouni, Marc & Tramontana, Fabio, 2013. "The debt trap: a two-compartment train wreck," MPRA Paper 47578, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. repec:bla:sajeco:v:84:y:2016:i:4:p:520-537 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Jiranyakul, Komain, 2017. "Is the Thai Government Revenue-Spending Nexus Asymmetric?," MPRA Paper 83163, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Athanasios Athanasenas & Constantinos Katrakilidis & Emmanouil Trachanas, 2014. "Government spending and revenues in the Greek economy: evidence from nonlinear cointegration," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 41(2), pages 365-376, May.
    7. Magazzino, Cosimo, 2010. "Public expenditure and revenue in Italy, 1862-1993," MPRA Paper 27308, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Phiri, Andrew, 2016. "Asymmetries in the revenue-expenditure nexus: New evidence from South Africa," MPRA Paper 75224, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Artzrouni, Marc & Tramontana, Fabio, 2014. "The debt trap: A two-compartment train wreck… and how to avoid it," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 241-256.
    10. Trachanas, Emmanouil & Katrakilidis, Constantinos, 2013. "Fiscal deficits under financial pressure and insolvency: Evidence for Italy, Greece and Spain," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 730-749.
    11. repec:seb:journl:v:15:y:2017:i:1:p:47-61 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Kollias, Christos & Papadamou, Stephanos & Psarianos, Iacovos, 2014. "Fiscal imbalances and asymmetric adjustment under Labour and Conservative governments in the UK," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 208-213.

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