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An empirical evaluation of China's monetary policies

  • Fan, Longzhen
  • Yu, Yihong
  • Zhang, Chu
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    This paper investigates the responsiveness of the Chinese government's monetary policies in terms of the money supply and interest rates to economic conditions and the effectiveness of these policies in achieving the goals of stimulating economic growth and controlling inflation. We analyze the responsiveness and effectiveness by estimating the Taylor rule, the McCallum rule, and a vector autoregressive model using quarterly data in the period of 1992-2009. The results show that, overall, the monetary policy variables respond to economic growth and the inflation rate, but the magnitudes of the responses are much weaker than those observed in market economies. Money supply responded actively to both the inflation rate and the real output and had certain effects on the future inflation rates and real output. The official interest rates, on the other hand, responded passively to the inflation rate and did not respond to the real output. They do not have any effect on future inflation rates and real output either.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Macroeconomics.

    Volume (Year): 33 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 2 (June)
    Pages: 358-371

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:33:y:2011:i:2:p:358-371
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622617

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