IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jhecon/v32y2013i3p504-514.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Feasible methods to estimate disease based price indexes

Author

Listed:
  • Bradley, Ralph

Abstract

There is a consensus that statistical agencies should report medical data by disease rather than by service. This study computes price indexes that are necessary to deflate nominal disease expenditures and to decompose their growth into price, treated prevalence and output per patient growth. Unlike previous studies, it uses methods that can be implemented by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). For the calendar years 2005–2010, I find that these feasible disease based indexes are approximately 1% lower on an annual basis than indexes computed by current methods at BLS. This gives evidence that traditional medical price indexes have not accounted for the more efficient use of medical inputs in treating most diseases.

Suggested Citation

  • Bradley, Ralph, 2013. "Feasible methods to estimate disease based price indexes," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 504-514.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:32:y:2013:i:3:p:504-514
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2013.01.005
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167629613000064
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Feenstra, Robert C, 1995. "Exact Hedonic Price Indexes," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(4), pages 634-653, November.
    2. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
    3. Diewert, W. E., 1976. "Exact and superlative index numbers," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 115-145, May.
    4. Ana Aizcorbe & Ralph Bradley & Ryan Greenaway-McGrevy & Brad Herauf & Richard Kane & Eli Liebman & Sarah Pack & Lyubov Rozental, 2011. "Alternative Price Indexes for Medical Care: Evidence from the MEPS Survey," BEA Working Papers 0069, Bureau of Economic Analysis.
    5. David M. Cutler & Mark McClellan & Joseph P. Newhouse & Dahlia Remler, 1998. "Are Medical Prices Declining? Evidence from Heart Attack Treatments," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(4), pages 991-1024.
    6. Aizcorbe, Ana & Nestoriak, Nicole, 2011. "Changing mix of medical care services: Stylized facts and implications for price indexes," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 568-574, May.
    7. Xue Song & William D. Marder & Robert Houchens & Jonathan E. Conklin & Ralph Bradley, 2009. "Can A Disease-Based Price Index Improve the Estimation of the Medical Consumer Price Index?," NBER Chapters,in: Price Index Concepts and Measurement, pages 329-368 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Ernst R. Berndt & Susan Busch & Richard Frank, 2001. "Treatment Price Indexes for Acute Phase Major Depression," NBER Chapters,in: Medical Care Output and Productivity, pages 463-508 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Jack E. Triplett, 2001. "What's Different about Health? Human Repair and Car Repair in National Accounts and in National Health Accounts," NBER Chapters,in: Medical Care Output and Productivity, pages 15-96 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ana Aizcorbe & Tina Highfill, 2015. "Medical Care Expenditure Indexes for the US, 1980-2006," BEA Working Papers 0121, Bureau of Economic Analysis.
    2. repec:aea:jecper:v:31:y:2017:i:2:p:187-210 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Dunn, Abe & Shapiro, Adam Hale & Liebman, Eli, 2013. "Geographic variation in commercial medical-care expenditures: A framework for decomposing price and utilization," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1153-1165.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Price indexes; Cost of living index; Superlative indexes;

    JEL classification:

    • C43 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Index Numbers and Aggregation
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:32:y:2013:i:3:p:504-514. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.