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Surprise vs anticipated information announcements: Are prices affected differently? An investigation in the context of stock splits

  • Hwang, Soosung
  • Keswani, Aneel
  • Shackleton, Mark B.

We compare the long run reaction to anticipated and surprise information announcements using stock splits. Although there is underreaction in both cases, anticipated splits are treated differently to those that are unforeseen. After anticipated splits, cumulative abnormal returns peak at one-and-a-half times the level observed after unanticipated splits although the time taken for the announcement to be absorbed into prices is the same. We explain the difference in underreaction by the degree to which split announcements are believed and hence invested in. The favorable signal conveyed in forecast splits is more credible owing to their better pre-split performance, resulting in a far more pronounced underreaction effect.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Banking & Finance.

Volume (Year): 32 (2008)
Issue (Month): 5 (May)
Pages: 643-653

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jbfina:v:32:y:2008:i:5:p:643-653
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jbf

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  1. Ikenberry, David L. & Rankine, Graeme & Stice, Earl K., 1996. "What Do Stock Splits Really Signal?," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 31(03), pages 357-375, September.
  2. Muscarella, Chris J. & Vetsuypens, Michael R., 1996. "Stock splits: Signaling or liquidity? The case of ADR 'solo-splits'," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 3-26, September.
  3. Brennan, Michael J. & Copeland, Thomas E., 1988. "Stock splits, stock prices, and transaction costs," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 83-101, October.
  4. Barber, Brad M. & Lyon, John D., 1997. "Detecting long-run abnormal stock returns: The empirical power and specification of test statistics," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 341-372, March.
  5. Loughran, Tim & Ritter, Jay R., 2000. "Uniformly least powerful tests of market efficiency," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 361-389, March.
  6. David L. Ikenberry & Sundaresh Ramnath, 2002. "Underreaction to Self-Selected News Events: The Case of Stock Splits," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 15(2), pages 489-526, March.
  7. Ederington, Louis H. & Lee, Jae Ha, 1996. "The Creation and Resolution of Market Uncertainty: The Impact of Information Releases on Implied Volatility," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 31(04), pages 513-539, December.
  8. Fama, Eugene F, et al, 1969. "The Adjustment of Stock Prices to New Information," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 10(1), pages 1-21, February.
  9. Jinho Byun & Michael S. Rozeff, 2003. "Long-run Performance after Stock Splits: 1927 to 1996," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 58(3), pages 1063-1086, 06.
  10. Desai, Hemang & Jain, Prem C, 1997. "Long-Run Common Stock Returns following Stock Splits and Reverse Splits," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70(3), pages 409-33, July.
  11. Lakonishok, Josef & Lev, Baruch, 1987. " Stock Splits and Stock Dividends: Why, Who, and When," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(4), pages 913-32, September.
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