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The effects of open access on un-published documents: A case study of economics working papers

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  • Frandsen, Tove Faber

Abstract

The use of scholarly publications that have not been formally published in e.g. journals is widespread in some fields. In the past they have been disseminated through various channels of informal communication. However, the Internet has enabled dissemination of these un-published and often unrefereed publications to a much wider audience. This is particularly interesting seen in relation to the highly disputed open access advantage as the potential advantage for low visibility publications has not been given much attention in the literature. The present study examines the role of working papers in economics during a 10-year period (1996–2005). It shows that working papers are increasingly becoming visible in the field specific databases. The impact of working papers is relatively low; however, high impact working paper series have citation rate levels similar to the low impact journals in the field. There is no tendency to an increase in impact during the 10 years which is the case for the high impact journals. Consequently, the result of this study does not provide evidence of an open access advantage for working papers in economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Frandsen, Tove Faber, 2009. "The effects of open access on un-published documents: A case study of economics working papers," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 124-133.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:infome:v:3:y:2009:i:2:p:124-133
    DOI: 10.1016/j.joi.2008.12.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nederhof, A. J. & van Raan, A. F. J., 1993. "A bibliometric analysis of six economics research groups: A comparison with peer review," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 353-368, August.
    2. Gaulé, Patrick & Maystre, Nicolas, 2011. "Getting cited: Does open access help?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(10), pages 1332-1338.
      • Patrick Gaulé & Nicolas Maystre, 2008. "Getting cited: does open access help?," CEMI Working Papers cemi-workingpaper-2008-00, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Collège du Management de la Technologie, Management of Technology and Entrepreneurship Institute, Chaire en Economie et Management de l'Innovation.
    3. Frank Neri & Joan R. Rodgers, 2006. "Ranking Australian Economics Departments by Research Productivity," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 82(s1), pages 74-84, September.
    4. Craig, Iain D. & Plume, Andrew M. & McVeigh, Marie E. & Pringle, James & Amin, Mayur, 2007. "Do open access articles have greater citation impact?," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 1(3), pages 239-248.
    5. Johan Bollen & Marko A. Rodriquez & Herbert Van de Sompel, 2006. "Journal status," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 69(3), pages 669-687, December.
    6. Joan R. Rodgers & Frank Neri, 2007. "Research Productivity Of Australian Academic Economists: Human‐Capital And Fixed Effects," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 67-87, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alessio J. G. Brown & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2017. "Three decades of publishing research in population economics," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(1), pages 11-27, January.
    2. Juliana Loureiro Almeida Campos & André Sobral & Josivan Soares Silva & Thiago Antonio Sousa Araújo & Washington Soares Ferreira-Júnior & Flávia Rosa Santoro & Gilney Charll Santos & Ulysses Paulino A, 2016. "Insularity and citation behavior of scientific articles in young fields: the case of ethnobiology," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 109(2), pages 1037-1055, November.
    3. Nuredini, Kaltrina & Peters, Isabella, 2019. "The presence and issues of altmetrics and citation data from Crossref for working papers with different identifiers from Econstor and RePEc in the discipline of Economic and Business Studies," EconStor Conference Papers 204461, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    4. Amalia Más-Bleda & Isidro F. Aguillo, 2013. "Can a personal website be useful as an information source to assess individual scientists? The case of European highly cited researchers," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 96(1), pages 51-67, July.

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