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Mergers and innovation in big pharma

  • Ornaghi, Carmine

The aims of this paper are to study the effects of mergers on the R&D activity of consolidated firms and to explore the relationship between ex-ante relatedness of merging parties and their ex-post performances. The analysis is conducted using data of the pharmaceutical industry for the period 1988-2004. The empirical results suggest that merged companies have on average, worse performances than the group of non-merging firms. This result is confirmed when I account for the endogeneous formation of mergers by selecting a control group first using the propensity score method and then taking into account the technological relatedness of the firms. Finally, I find that higher levels of technological relatedness are not associated with better R&D outcomes.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal International Journal of Industrial Organization.

Volume (Year): 27 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 70-79

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Handle: RePEc:eee:indorg:v:27:y:2009:i:1:p:70-79
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  1. Nick Bloom & Mark Schankerman & John Van Reenen, 2005. "Identifying technology spillovers and product market rivalry," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  2. Rebecca Henderson & Iain Cockburn, . "Scale, Scope and Spillovers: The Determinants of Research Productivity in Drug Discovery," Working Papers ec25/94, Department of Economics, University of Lancaster.
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  8. White, Lawrence J, 1987. "Antitrust and Merger Policy: A Review and Critique," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 13-22, Fall.
  9. David J. Ravenscraft & William F. Long, 2000. "Paths to Creating Value in Pharmaceutical Mergers," NBER Chapters, in: Mergers and Productivity, pages 287-326 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Mueller, Dennis C., 1996. "Lessons from the United States's antitrust history," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 415-445, June.
  11. Patricia M. Danzon & Sean Nicholson & Nuno Sousa Pereira, 2003. "Productivity in Pharmaceutical Biotechnology R&D: The Role of Experience and Alliances," NBER Working Papers 9615, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Rajeev H. Dehejia & Sadek Wahba, 1998. "Propensity Score Matching Methods for Non-experimental Causal Studies," NBER Working Papers 6829, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Richard Blundell & Monica Costa Dias, 2000. "Evaluation methods for non-experimental data," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 21(4), pages 427-468, January.
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