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Edgar Allan Poe's riddle: Framing effects in repeated matching pennies games

Listed author(s):
  • Eliaz, Kfir
  • Rubinstein, Ariel

Framing effects have a significant influence on the finitely repeated matching pennies game. The combination of being labelled "a guesser," and having the objective of matching the opponent's action, appears to be advantageous. We find that being a player who aims to match the opponent's action is advantageous irrespective of whether the player moves first or second. We examine alternative explanations for our results and relate them to Edgar Allan Poe's "The Purloined Letter." We propose a behavioral model which generates the observed asymmetry in the players' performance.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0899-8256(09)00132-8
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Games and Economic Behavior.

Volume (Year): 71 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 88-99

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Handle: RePEc:eee:gamebe:v:71:y:2011:i:1:p:88-99
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622836

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  1. Mookherjee Dilip & Sopher Barry, 1994. "Learning Behavior in an Experimental Matching Pennies Game," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 62-91, July.
  2. Wooders, John & Shachat, Jason M., 2001. "On the Irrelevance of Risk Attitudes in Repeated Two-Outcome Games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 342-363, February.
  3. Brown, James N & Rosenthal, Robert W, 1990. "Testing the Minimax Hypothesis: A Re-examination of O'Neill's Game Experiment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(5), pages 1065-1081, September.
  4. Cooper, Russell & Douglas V. DeJong & Robert Forsythe & Thomas W. Ross, 1993. "Forward Induction in the Battle-of-the-Sexes Games," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1303-1316, December.
  5. Roberto Weber & Colin Camerer & Marc Knez, 2004. "Timing and Virtual Observability in Ultimatum Bargaining and “Weak Link” Coordination Games," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 7(1), pages 25-48, February.
  6. Yaakov Kaarev & Werner G³th & Hartmut Kliemt, 2005. "How to Play Randomly without a Random Generator: The Case of Maximin Players," Homo Oeconomicus, Institute of SocioEconomics, vol. 22, pages 231-255.
  7. Ben-Porath Elchanan, 1993. "Repeated Games with Finite Automata," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 17-32, February.
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