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Progress towards and barriers to implementation of a risk framework for US federal wildland fire policy and decision making

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  • Calkin, David C.
  • Finney, Mark A.
  • Ager, Alan A.
  • Thompson, Matthew P.
  • Gebert, Krista M.

Abstract

In this paper we review progress towards the implementation of a risk management framework for US federal wildland fire policy and operations. We first describe new developments in wildfire simulation technology that catalyzed the development of risk-based decision support systems for strategic wildfire management. These systems include new analytical methods to measure wildfire risk to human and ecological values and to inform fuel treatment investment strategies at national, regional, and local scales. Application of the risk management framework to support wildfire incidents has been dramatically advanced with the Wildland Fire Decision Support System and allowed policy modifications that encourage management of incidents for multiple objectives. The new wildfire risk management decision support systems we discuss provide Federal agencies in the US the ability to integrate risk-informed approaches to a wide range of wildfire management responsibilities and decisions. While much progress has been made, there remain several barriers that need to be addressed to fully integrate risk science into current wildfire management practices. We conclude by identifying five primary issues that if properly addressed could help public land management better realize the opportunities and potential payoffs from fully adopting a risk management paradigm.

Suggested Citation

  • Calkin, David C. & Finney, Mark A. & Ager, Alan A. & Thompson, Matthew P. & Gebert, Krista M., 2011. "Progress towards and barriers to implementation of a risk framework for US federal wildland fire policy and decision making," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(5), pages 378-389, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:forpol:v:13:y:2011:i:5:p:378-389
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kim, Young-Hwan & Bettinger, Pete & Finney, Mark, 2009. "Spatial optimization of the pattern of fuel management activities and subsequent effects on simulated wildfires," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 197(1), pages 253-265, August.
    2. Dimopoulou, Maria & Giannikos, Ioannis, 2004. "Towards an integrated framework for forest fire control," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 152(2), pages 476-486, January.
    3. Rideout, Douglas B. & Ziesler, Pamela S. & Kling, Robert & Loomis, John B. & Botti, Stephen J., 2008. "Estimating rates of substitution for protecting values at risk for initial attack planning and budgeting," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 205-219, February.
    4. Chuvieco, Emilio & Aguado, Inmaculada & Yebra, Marta & Nieto, Héctor & Salas, Javier & Martín, M. Pilar & Vilar, Lara & Martínez, Javier & Martín, Susana & Ibarra, Paloma & de la Riva, Juan & Baeza, J, 2010. "Development of a framework for fire risk assessment using remote sensing and geographic information system technologies," Ecological Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 221(1), pages 46-58.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alcasena, Fermín J. & Salis, Michele & Nauslar, Nicholas J. & Aguinaga, A. Eduardo & Vega-García, Cristina, 2016. "Quantifying economic losses from wildfires in black pine afforestations of northern Spain," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 153-167.
    2. Rossi, David & Kuusela, Olli-Pekka, 2020. "The influence of risk attitudes on suppression spending and on wildland fire program budgeting," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(C).
    3. Matthew J. Wibbenmeyer & Michael S. Hand & David E. Calkin & Tyron J. Venn & Matthew P. Thompson, 2013. "Risk Preferences in Strategic Wildfire Decision Making: A Choice Experiment with U.S. Wildfire Managers," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 33(6), pages 1021-1037, June.
    4. Michael S. Hand & Matthew J. Wibbenmeyer & David E. Calkin & Matthew P. Thompson, 2015. "Risk Preferences, Probability Weighting, and Strategy Tradeoffs in Wildfire Management," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 35(10), pages 1876-1891, October.

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