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Electricity market design for facilitating the integration of wind energy: Experience and prospects with the Australian National Electricity Market

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  • MacGill, Iain

Abstract

Australia has been an early and enthusiastic adopter of both electricity industry restructuring and market-based environmental regulation. The Australian National Electricity Market (NEM) was established in 1999 and Australia also implemented one of the world's first renewable energy target schemes in 2001. With significant recent growth in wind generation, Australia provides an interesting case for assessing different approaches to facilitating wind integration into the electricity industry. Wind project developers in Australia must assess both potential energy market and Tradeable Green Certificate income streams when making investments. Wind-farm energy income depends on the match of its uncertain time varying output with the regional half hourly market price; a price that exhibits daily, weekly and seasonal patterns and considerable uncertainty. Such price signals assist in driving investments that maximize project value to the electricity industry as a whole, including integration costs and benefits for other participants. Recent NEM rule changes will formally integrate wind generation in the market's scheduling processes while a centralized wind forecasting system has also been introduced. This paper outlines experience to date with wind integration in the NEM, describes the evolution of market rules in response and assesses their possible implications for facilitating high future wind penetrations.

Suggested Citation

  • MacGill, Iain, 2010. "Electricity market design for facilitating the integration of wind energy: Experience and prospects with the Australian National Electricity Market," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 3180-3191, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:38:y:2010:i:7:p:3180-3191
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. MacGill, Iain & Outhred, Hugh & Nolles, Karel, 2006. "Some design lessons from market-based greenhouse gas regulation in the restructured Australian electricity industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 11-25, January.
    2. Richard J. Green, 2008. "Electricity Wholesale Markets: Designs Now and in a Low-carbon Future," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 95-124.
    3. Kann, Shayle, 2009. "Overcoming barriers to wind project finance in Australia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 3139-3148, August.
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    Wind integration electricity market;

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